The Daily

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Synopsis

This moment demands an explanation. This show is on a mission to find it. Only what you want to know, none of what you dont. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Powered by New York Times journalism. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Episodes

  • How They Stormed Congress

    How They Stormed Congress

    08/01/2021 Duration: 31min

    This episode contains strong language. The pro-Trump mob that stormed the Capitol on Wednesday made their plans in plain sight. They organized on social media platforms and spoke openly of their intentions to occupy the Capitol.But leaders in Washington opted for a modest law enforcement presence. In the aftermath, those security preparations are attracting intense scrutiny.Today, we explore how the events of Jan. 6 could have happened.Guest: Sheera Frenkel, who covers cybersecurity for The New York Times; Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a homeland security correspondent for The Times. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: Inside Trump supporters’ online echo chambers, the chaos of Jan. 6 could be seen coming.Failures by the police have spurred resignations and complaints of double standards.During the storming of the Capitol, social media sites were used by the mob to share informati

  • An Assault on the Capitol

    An Assault on the Capitol

    07/01/2021 Duration: 39min

    This episode contains strong language.It was always going to be a tense day in Washington. In the baseless campaign to challenge Joe Biden’s victory, Wednesday had been framed by President Trump and his allies as the moment for a final stand.But what unfolded was disturbing and previously unthinkable: A mob, urged on by the president, advanced on the Capitol building as Congress was certifying the election results and eventually breached its walls.Today, the story of what happened from Times journalists who were inside the Capitol.Guests: Nicholas Fandos, a national reporter for The New York Times; Jonathan Martin, a national political correspondent for The Times; and Emily Cochrane, a congressional reporter for The Times. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: Journalists from The Times witnessed the violence and mayhem. Here’s how it unfolded.One of the most disturbing aspects

  • A Historic Night in Georgia

    A Historic Night in Georgia

    06/01/2021 Duration: 19min

    The long fight for control of the U.S. Senate is drawing to a close in Georgia, and the Democrats appear set to win out — the Rev. Raphael Warnock is the projected winner of his race against Senator Kelly Loeffler, while Jon Ossoff is heavily favored to beat the other incumbent Republican, Senator David Perdue. Today, we look at the results so far from these history-making Senate races and at what they mean for the future and fortunes of the two main parties.Guest: Nate Cohn, a domestic correspondent for The Upshot at The New York Times. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: A Baptist preacher born and raised in Georgia, Raphael Warnock has defeated Kelly Loeffler to become his state’s first Black senator, breaking a barrier with distinct meaning in American politics.A surge in turnout from Georgia’s Black voters has powered the fortunes of Mr. Warnock and Jon Ossoff.You c

  • The Georgia Runoffs, Part 2: ‘I Have Zero Confidence in My Vote’

    The Georgia Runoffs, Part 2: ‘I Have Zero Confidence in My Vote’

    05/01/2021 Duration: 46min

    Since the presidential election was called for Joe Biden, President Trump has relentlessly attacked the integrity of the count in Georgia. He has floated conspiracy theories to explain away his loss and attacked Republican officials.Today, we speak to Republican activists and voters on the ground and consider to what extent, if at all, Mr. Trump’s rhetoric could discourage Republicans from voting in the runoff elections. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: Senators Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue have sought to motivate a conservative base that remains loyal to Mr. Trump while also luring back some of the defectors who helped deliver Georgia to a Democratic presidential candidate for the first time since 1992.Democrats may have claimed a bigger share of the early vote than they did in November’s vote, election data shows. Here’s what else we know about the voting in Georgia so far

  • The Georgia Runoffs, Part 1: ‘We Are Black Diamonds.’

    The Georgia Runoffs, Part 1: ‘We Are Black Diamonds.’

    04/01/2021 Duration: 43min

    A strong Black turnout will be integral to Democratic success in the U.S. Senate races in Georgia this week.In the first of a two-part examination of election strategies in the Georgia runoffs, we sit down with Stacey Abrams, a Georgia Democrat who has become synonymous with the party’s attempts to win statewide, to talk about her efforts to mobilize Black voters.And we join LaTosha Brown, a leader of Black Voters Matter, as she heads out to speak to voters.Guest: Audra D.S. Burch, a national correspondent for The New York Times. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: Control of the Senate could hinge on Black voters in Georgia — and on an ambitious effort by the likes of Black Voters Matter to get them to the polls in the largest numbers ever for the runoff elections on Tuesday.Democrats are making their final push to rally supporters, targeting Black voters in regions far from

  • Genie Chance and the Great Alaska Earthquake: An Update

    Genie Chance and the Great Alaska Earthquake: An Update

    31/12/2020 Duration: 56min

    This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.When Alaska was hit by a devastating earthquake in 1964, it was the voice of Genie Chance — a journalist, wife and mother — that held the state together in the aftermath.In the episode, we heard about sociologists from Ohio State University’s Disaster Research Center rushing to Anchorage to study residents’ behavior.Today, Jon Mooallem, who brought us Genie’s story in May, speaks to a sociologist from the University of Delaware to make sense of the current moment and how it compares with the fallout of the Great Alaska Earthquake.Guest: Jon Mooallem, writer at large for The New York Times Magazine and author of “This Is Chance!,” a book about the aftermath of the earthquake.For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background Reading: For our Opinion section, Jo

  • ‘Who Replaces Me?’: An Update

    ‘Who Replaces Me?’: An Update

    30/12/2020 Duration: 46min

    This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.Scott Watson — a Black police officer in his hometown, Flint, Mich. — has worked to become a pillar of the community. And he always believed his identity put him in a unique position to discharge his duties.After watching the video of the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody in May, his job became a source of self-consciousness instead of pride.Today, we call up Scott once again and ask how he’s been doing and how things have been in his police department.Guest: Scott Watson, a police officer in Flint, Mich.For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading:Lynsea Garrison wrote about interviewing Scott in an edition of The Daily newsletter.Many Black and Hispanic officers in New York City have found themselves caught between competing

  • A New Way to Mourn: An Update

    A New Way to Mourn: An Update

    29/12/2020 Duration: 43min

    This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes from this year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran.In our society, the public part of mourning is ritualized by a coming together. What do we do now that the opportunity for collective mourning has been taken away?Earlier this year, we heard the story of Wayne Irwin. A retired minister of the United Church of Canada who lost his wife, Flora May, during the coronavirus pandemic.He never once considered delaying her memorial, opting to celebrate her life over the internet — a new ritual that, as it turned out, felt more authentic and real.Today, we check back in with Wayne to find out how he’s been doing in the months since his wife’s passing.Guest: Catherine Porter, Toronto bureau chief for The New York Times.For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading:The rituals of our lives have been transformed

  • How a Small Bar Battled to Survive the Coronavirus: An Update

    How a Small Bar Battled to Survive the Coronavirus: An Update

    28/12/2020 Duration: 48min

    This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.When Jack Nicas, a technology reporter for The Times, first moved to California five years ago, he set about finding a local bar of choice. Unpretentious, cheap and relaxed, the Hatch fit the bill.Over six months during the coronavirus pandemic, he charted the fortunes of the bar and its staff members as the lockdown threatened to upend the success of the small business.Today, Jack checks in with the bar’s owner — Louwenda Kachingwe, known to everyone as Pancho — to see what has happened since we last heard from him in the fall.Guest: Jack Nicas, a technology reporter for The New York Times. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: Here’s the full article about the Oakland tavern and its staff members as they try to weather the fallout from

  • The Sunday Read: Cher Everlasting

    The Sunday Read: 'Cher Everlasting'

    27/12/2020 Duration: 21min

    The escapism of movies took on a new importance during pandemic isolation. Caity Weaver, the author of this week’s Sunday Read, says that to properly embrace this year’s cinematic achievements, the Academy Awards should not only hand out accolades to new releases, but also to the older films that sustained us through this period.If they did, Caity argues, Cher would be on course to win a second Oscar for her performance as Loretta Castorini in 1987’s “Moonstruck” — a film that, under lockdown, was a salve to many.On today’s episode, a conversation with Cher about the film’s production, cast and legacy.This story was written by Caity Weaver and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

  • 24 Hours Inside a Brooklyn Hospital: An Update

    24 Hours Inside a Brooklyn Hospital: An Update

    24/12/2020 Duration: 30min

    This episode contains strong language.This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.When New York City was the epicenter of the coronavirus crisis in the U.S., Sheri Fink, a public health correspondent for The Times, was embedded at the Brooklyn Hospital Center.In April, she brought us the story of a single day in its intensive care unit, where a majority of patients were sick with the virus.Today, we check back in with one of the doctors we heard from on the episode, the unflappable Dr. Josh Rosenberg.Guest: Sheri Fink, a correspondent covering public health for The New York Times.For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading:“Covid will not win” — here are some portraits and interviews with the staff members powering the Brooklyn Hospital Center.For more information on today’s episode, visit nyt

  • The Year in Good News

    The Year in Good News

    23/12/2020 Duration: 22min

    A few weeks ago, we put a callout on The Daily, asking people to send in their good news from a particularly bleak year.The response was overwhelming. Audio messages poured into our inboxes from around the world, with multiple emails arriving every minute. There was a man who said that he had met Oprah and realized he was an alcoholic, a woman who shared that she had finally found time to finish a scarf after five years and another man who said he had finished his thesis on representations of horsemanship in American cinema. Eventually, we decided to construct the entire show out of these messages.This episode is the result — a Daily holiday card of good news, from our team to you.

  • The Lives They Lived

    The Lives They Lived

    22/12/2020 Duration: 44min

    It is a very human thing, at the end of a year, to stop and take stock. Part of that involves acknowledging that some remarkable people who were here in 2020 will be not joining us in 2021.Today, we take a moment to honor the lives of four of those people. And in marveling at the extraordinary and sometimes vividly ordinary facets of their time among us, we hold a mirror up to the complexities of our own lives.For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

  • Delilah

    Delilah

    21/12/2020 Duration: 34min

    The radio host Delilah has been on the air for more than 40 years. She takes calls from listeners across the United States, as they open up about their heavy hearts, their hopes and the important people in their lives.She tells callers that they’re loved, and then she plays them a song. “A love song needs a lyric that tells a story,” she says. “And touches your heart, either makes you laugh, or makes you cry or makes you swoon.”On today’s episode, producers Andy Mills and Bianca Giaever do what millions before them have done: They call Delilah.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

  • The Sunday Read: The Movement to Bring Death Closer

    The Sunday Read: 'The Movement to Bring Death Closer'

    20/12/2020 Duration: 01h08min

    “If death practices reveal a culture’s values,” writes Maggie Jones, the author of today’s Sunday Read, “we choose convenience, outsourcing, an aversion to knowing or seeing too much.”Enter home-funeral guides, practitioners who believe families can benefit from tending to — and spending time with — the bodies of the deceased.On today’s Sunday Read, listen to Ms. Jones’s story about the home-funeral movement and the changing nature of America’s funeral practices.This story was written by Maggie Jones and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

  • Evicted During the Pandemic

    Evicted During the Pandemic

    18/12/2020 Duration: 31min

    For years there has been an evictions crisis in the United States. The pandemic has made it more acute.On today’s episode, our conversations with single mother of two from Atlanta over several months during the pandemic. After she lost her job in March, the bottom fell out of her finances and eviction papers started coming. The federal safety net only stretched so far.And we ask, with Congress seeking to pass another stimulus bill, what do the next few months hold for renters in the United States?Guest: Matthew Desmond, a Professor of Sociology at Princeton University and contributing writer for The Times Magazine. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: Emergency pandemic funding to help renters must be distributed by Dec. 30. But getting the money to those who need it is no small task.Residents of weekly rentals worry they will be kicked out if they can’t pay the rent. It’s unc

  • Should Facebook Be Broken Up?

    Should Facebook Be Broken Up?

    17/12/2020 Duration: 29min

    This episode contains strong language.When the photo-sharing app Instagram started to grow in popularity in the 2010s, the chief executive of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, had two options: build something comparable or buy it out. He opted for the latter.The subsequent $1 billion deal is central to a case being brought against Facebook by the federal government and 48 attorneys general. They want to see the social network broken up.Will they succeed? On today’s episode, we look at one of the biggest cases to hit Silicon Valley in decades.Guest: Mike Isaac, a technology correspondent for The New York Times. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: Regulators have accused Facebook of buying up rising rivals to cement its dominance over social media.The cases against Facebook are far from a slam dunk — the standards of proof are formidable.For more information on today’s episode, visit

  • Hacked, Again

    Hacked, Again

    16/12/2020 Duration: 26min

    Undetected for months, sophisticated hackers working on behalf of a foreign government were able to breach computer networks across a number of U.S. government agencies. It’s believed to be the handiwork of Russian intelligence.And this is far from the first time. Today, why and how such hacks keep happening and the delicate calculation that dictates how and if America retaliates.Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: In one of the most sophisticated and perhaps largest hacks in more than five years, email systems were breached at the Treasury and Commerce Departments. Other breaches are under investigation.The sophistication and scope of the attack has stunned experts. About 18,000 private and government users downloaded a Russian tainted software update — a Trojan horse of sorts — that gave

  • America’s First Coronavirus Vaccinations

    America’s First Coronavirus Vaccinations

    15/12/2020 Duration: 26min

    North Dakota and New Orleans have been hit particularly hard by the coronavirus.On today’s episode, we speak to health care workers in both places as they become some of the first to receive and administer the vaccine, and tap into the mood of hope and excitement tempered by a bleak fact: The battle against Covid-19 is not yet over. Guest: Jack Healy, a national correspondent for The New York Times. For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: Monday’s vaccinations, the first in a staggeringly complicated national campaign, were a moment infused with hope and pain for hundreds of America’s health care workers.Some of the very medical centers that have endured the worst of the coronavirus found the gloom that has long filled their corridors replaced by elation. The vaccine campaign, however, began on the same day that America surpassed 300,000 deaths from Covid-19.For more informa

  • The U.S. Approves a Vaccine

    The U.S. Approves a Vaccine

    14/12/2020 Duration: 30min

    The Food and Drug Administration authorized Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine for emergency use on Friday, clearing the way for millions of highly vulnerable people to begin receiving the vaccine within days.The authorization is a historic turning point in a pandemic that has taken more than 290,000 lives in the United States. With the decision, the United States becomes the sixth country — in addition to Britain, Bahrain, Canada, Saudi Arabia and Mexico — to clear the vaccine. Today, we ask the science and health reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr. what might happen next.Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times.For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.Background reading: Pfizer has a deal with the U.S. government to supply 100 million doses of the vaccine by next March. Under that agreement, the shots will be free to the public.The vaccines are on their way, but experts still s

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