Polar Voices

Informações:

Synopsis

Everyone is talking about climate change, but what does it all mean? Listen in as PoLAR Voices breaks down the science of climate change with people living and working in the polar regions.

Episodes

  • Episode 12 - Arctic Connection: Community Collaborations in Research

    06/12/2016 Duration: 08min

    Arctic inhabitants are taking research into their own hands. Rather than letting scientists determine what needs to be studied, Inuit communities in Canada are determining what questions they need answered and seeking researchers who can help them.

  • Episode 11 - Vulnerable Coasts

    06/12/2016 Duration: 09min

    Coastlines everywhere are hit by waves and storms from rising seas that can eat away at the shoreline, but Arctic coasts once frozen in place by permafrost are especially susceptible to coastal erosion as temperatures rise and permafrost thaws. Increased erosion is threatening some coastal communities, forcing long-standing communities to consider relocation as the land underneath them disappears.

  • Episode 10 - The Disappearing Frozen Ocean

    06/12/2016 Duration: 10min

    Sea ice is rapidly decreasing due to accelerated warming in the Arctic. Animals, subsistence hunters, and researchers who rely on the frozen surface are adapting to less ice while trying to preserve their livelihoods.

  • Episode 9 - How Yukon glaciers are responding to climate change

    03/10/2016 Duration: 09min

    Many glaciers in the Kluane Region are fed by a massive reservoir of snow and ice that sits on top of the St. Elias Mountains. Glaciologists are studying how global warming is affecting the physical characteristics and behavior of these glaciers as they retreat further up mountain slopes.

  • Episode 8 - Warm, thaw, repeat: how the degradation of permafrost will amplify climate change

    03/10/2016 Duration: 09min

    Frozen soils (or permafrost) in the Arctic are thawing, destabilizing the ground surface and damaging buildings and roads. Although infrastructure is crumbling, scientists are more concerned with the potential for runaway global warming as preserved plant material in the soils starts to break down into carbon dioxide. Global climate action plans are in place to limit global warming to 2⁰C, but the huge volume of carbon stored in the soils may push us past that target.

  • Episode 7- Upwards and northwards: tree line advancement in the alpine, subarctic and Arctic

    03/10/2016 Duration: 08min

    As the Arctic warms, the limits of where trees can grow are slowly shifting up mountains and further north. Researchers at the Kluane Lake Research Station in Yukon, Canada are trying to determine the range of environmental conditions that control the position of the tree line and ultimately forecast the position of the tree line in the future.

  • Per6.- HSwanson

    15/04/2016 Duration: 16min

    Dr. Heidi Swanson is an assistant professor and university research chair at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. She studies the response of aquatic food webs to climate change and the accumulation of mercury in Arctic lakes. Her lab, the Swanson Lab Group, travels to ecosystems as far west as the North Slope in Alaska and as far east as Lake Superior to study fish ecology and track contaminants in lakes. Her team works collaboratively with other academics, government researchers, Aboriginal communities, and industry to conduct meaningful research for multiple stakeholders.

  • Per6.- SCGerlach

    15/04/2016 Duration: 13min

    Dr. Craig Gerlach is the Academic Coordinator for Sustainability at the University of Calgary and a professor in the Department of Anthropology and Archaeology. Prior to joining the University of Calgary, Gerlach spent twenty years as a professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks where he conducted research on food systems in northern aboriginal communities including the sustainability of fisheries and the socioeconomic impact of oil and gas development. His current research focuses on sustainable food, water, and energy systems in remote northern villages and emphasizes meaningful results for stakeholders. As a result, Gerlach is looking at solutions that will reduce rural village dependence on large urban centers including community gardens, greenhouses, alternative energy sources, water infrastructure, housing and shelter, and novel rural community designs. http://anth.ucalgary.ca/profiles/1-4584890

  • Per6.- NKassi2

    15/04/2016 Duration: 11min

    Norma Kassi is co-founder and Director of Indigenous Collaboration at the Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research. Over the last 30 years, she has worked on issues related to contaminants, food security, climate change, wildlife protection, youth engagement and building community capacity. Kassi is Vuntut Gwitchin, which means People of the Lakes. Her understanding of traditional, scientific and ecological knowledge, passed on from Elders, has fostered a deep connection to the land and made her an advocate for the Gwitchin people. From 1985-1992, she served as a Member for Vuntut Gwitchin in Yukon's Legislative Assembly and was selected by the Elders to be a spokesperson for the preservation of the Porcupine Caribou Herd. She has received many awards including the National Wildlife Federation's Conservation and Achievement Award in 1991 and the Goldman Prize for conservation in 2002.

  • Per6.- NKassi1

    15/04/2016 Duration: 17min

    Norma Kassi is co-founder and Director of Indigenous Collaboration at the Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research. Over the last 30 years, she has worked on issues related to contaminants, food security, climate change, wildlife protection, youth engagement and building community capacity. Kassi is Vuntut Gwitchin, which means People of the Lakes. Her understanding of traditional, scientific and ecological knowledge, passed on from Elders, has fostered a deep connection to the land and made her an advocate for the Gwitchin people. From 1985-1992, she served as a Member for Vuntut Gwitchin in Yukon's Legislative Assembly and was selected by the Elders to be a spokesperson for the preservation of the Porcupine Caribou Herd. She has received many awards including the National Wildlife Federation's Conservation and Achievement Award in 1991 and the Goldman Prize for conservation in 2002.

  • Per5.- TSchuur3

    15/04/2016 Duration: 11min

    Dr. Ted Schuur is currently a professor of ecosystem ecology at Northern Arizona University and oversees the Ecosystem Dynamics Research Lab. While Polar Voices was conducting interviews, the Schuur lab was located at the University of Florida but has since moved to Northern Arizona University as part of the Center for Ecosystem Science and Society. The lab supports many graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Marguerite Mauritz is a postdoctoral research associate in the lab studying potential changes in the carbon cycle as permafrost thaws. Elizabeth Webb worked out of the lab as a graduate student and studied what happens to permafrost in winter near Healy, Alaska, as there is still some microbial decomposition taking place. John Krapek is a former field tech at the site. Jamie Hollingsworth is the site manager of the Bonanza Creek Long-Term Ecological Research Station outside of Fairbanks, Alaska. He also works with the Boreal Ecology Cooperative Research Unit, a partnership between the University of

  • Per5.- TSchuur2

    15/04/2016 Duration: 14min

    Dr. Ted Schuur is currently a professor of ecosystem ecology at Northern Arizona University and oversees the Ecosystem Dynamics Research Lab. While Polar Voices was conducting interviews, the Schuur lab was located at the University of Florida but has since moved to Northern Arizona University as part of the Center for Ecosystem Science and Society. The lab supports many graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Marguerite Mauritz is a postdoctoral research associate in the lab studying potential changes in the carbon cycle as permafrost thaws. Elizabeth Webb worked out of the lab as a graduate student and studied what happens to permafrost in winter near Healy, Alaska, as there is still some microbial decomposition taking place. John Krapek is a former field tech at the site. Jamie Hollingsworth is the site manager of the Bonanza Creek Long-Term Ecological Research Station outside of Fairbanks, Alaska. He also works with the Boreal Ecology Cooperative Research Unit, a partnership between the University of

  • Per5. -TSchuur1

    15/04/2016 Duration: 13min

    Dr. Ted Schuur is currently a professor of ecosystem ecology at Northern Arizona University and oversees the Ecosystem Dynamics Research Lab. While Polar Voices was conducting interviews, the Schuur lab was located at the University of Florida but has since moved to Northern Arizona University as part of the Center for Ecosystem Science and Society. The lab supports many graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Marguerite Mauritz is a postdoctoral research associate in the lab studying potential changes in the carbon cycle as permafrost thaws. Elizabeth Webb worked out of the lab as a graduate student and studied what happens to permafrost in winter near Healy, Alaska, as there is still some microbial decomposition taking place. John Krapek is a former field tech at the site. Jamie Hollingsworth is the site manager of the Bonanza Creek Long-Term Ecological Research Station outside of Fairbanks, Alaska. He also works with the Boreal Ecology Cooperative Research Unit, a partnership between the University of

  • Per5.- MJohansson

    15/04/2016 Duration: 10min

    Dr. Margareta Johansson is a researcher in the Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Science at Lund University as well as executive secretary at INTERACT—a consortium of circum-Arctic researchers and field stations. She studies permafrost in subarctic Sweden and manipulates snow conditions to determine how the land will respond to changes in climate.

  • Per4.- MFlannigan3

    15/04/2016 Duration: 09min

    Dr. Mike Flannigan is a professor with the Department of Renewable Resources at the University of Alberta and the Director of the Western Partnership for Wildland Fire Science located at the University of Alberta. He received his Bachelor of Science in Physics from the University of Manitoba, his Master of Science in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University, and his Doctorate in Plant Sciences from Cambridge University. After completing Meteorologist course MT35 with Environment Canada, Flannigan worked briefly as a meteorologist. Subsequently, Flannigan worked as a physical scientist, research scientist and senior research scientist with the Canadian Forest Service until he transitioned into his current role. Dr. Flannigan's primary research explores fire and weather/climate interactions including the potential impact of climatic change, lightning-ignited forest fires, landscape fire modelling and interactions between vegetation, fire and weather. He was the Editor-in-Chief of the International Jou

  • Per.4- MFlannigan2

    15/04/2016 Duration: 19min

    Dr. Mike Flannigan is a professor with the Department of Renewable Resources at the University of Alberta and the Director of the Western Partnership for Wildland Fire Science located at the University of Alberta. He received his Bachelor of Science in Physics from the University of Manitoba, his Master of Science in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University, and his Doctorate in Plant Sciences from Cambridge University. After completing Meteorologist course MT35 with Environment Canada, Flannigan worked briefly as a meteorologist. Subsequently, Flannigan worked as a physical scientist, research scientist and senior research scientist with the Canadian Forest Service until he transitioned into his current role. Dr. Flannigan's primary research explores fire and weather/climate interactions including the potential impact of climatic change, lightning-ignited forest fires, landscape fire modelling and interactions between vegetation, fire and weather. He was the Editor-in-Chief of the International Jou

  • Per.4- MFlannigan1

    15/04/2016 Duration: 13min

    Dr. Mike Flannigan is a professor with the Department of Renewable Resources at the University of Alberta and the Director of the Western Partnership for Wildland Fire Science located at the University of Alberta. He received his Bachelor of Science in Physics from the University of Manitoba, his Master of Science in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University, and his Doctorate in Plant Sciences from Cambridge University. After completing Meteorologist course MT35 with Environment Canada, Flannigan worked briefly as a meteorologist. Subsequently, Flannigan worked as a physical scientist, research scientist and senior research scientist with the Canadian Forest Service until he transitioned into his current role. Dr. Flannigan's primary research explores fire and weather/climate interactions including the potential impact of climatic change, lightning-ignited forest fires, landscape fire modelling and interactions between vegetation, fire and weather. He was the Editor-in-Chief of the International Jou

  • Per.4- RDavid

    15/04/2016 Duration: 08min

    Roy David, Sr. is an elder from Tetlin, Alaska. He grew up living a traditional subsistence lifestyle of hunting, trapping, fishing, and gardening. Roy David worked on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, as an alcohol counselor, and in law enforcement. He has also participated in dog team races. Roy David has great knowledge of traditional stories and is interested in sharing his knowledge and stories with the younger generation in hopes of keeping his Native traditions and values alive for the future.

  • Per.3- KTape2

    15/04/2016 Duration: 33min

    Dr. Ken Tape is an ecologist and research assistant professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Institute of Northern Engineering Water and Environmental Research Center. He studies the impact of climate change on the Arctic ecosystem and has used photography to compare the modern and historical landscapes. His photos eventually inspired the book "The Changing Arctic Landscape" and traveling exhibit "Then & Now, The Changing Arctic Landscape."

  • Per.3- KTape1

    15/04/2016 Duration: 08min

    Dr. Ken Tape is an ecologist and research assistant professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Institute of Northern Engineering Water and Environmental Research Center. He studies the impact of climate change on the Arctic ecosystem and has used photography to compare the modern and historical landscapes. His photos eventually inspired the book "The Changing Arctic Landscape" and traveling exhibit "Then & Now, The Changing Arctic Landscape."

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