The Economist Radio (All audio)

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Synopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodes

  • Checks and Balance: Left side story

    21/01/2022 Duration: 41min

    Joe Biden voters are more likely to have a negative view of the United States than those who voted for Donald Trump, according to new research from The Economist. A year since his inauguration, is this miserablism largely a result of President Biden’s recent woes, or is there something inherently gloomy in the left’s mindset?  The Economist’s Daniella Raz sifts through the poll findings. We go back to the time when a liberal philosopher imagined a dark future for America. And political psychologist Peter Ditto examines what makes liberal brains tick.  John Prideaux presents with Jon Fasman and Charlotte Howard. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unsustainable envelopment goals: China’s zero-covid fight

    21/01/2022 Duration: 20min

    The Omicron variant is destined to test the limits of a policy that has already proved costly: consumption, growth and confidence are all flagging. The effects of Russia’s gulag did not stop when the labour camps closed: there appear to be long-term benefits for nearby areas. And why cycling in the Arab world is on the rise.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Carl Bernstein

    20/01/2022 Duration: 26min

    The veteran reporter was a teenager when he first walked into a newsroom. He tells Anne McElvoy how that moment led him to become one half of the most famous bylines in journalism. They discuss the decline in trust in the media and echoes of Watergate in American politics today. And the author of “Chasing History” reflects on a painful moment from his past being turned into a film. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Heavyweight-price fight: how to beat global inflation

    20/01/2022 Duration: 24min

    Shoppers across the developed world face sharply rising prices, and leaders are reaching for all manner of remedies—but that’s what central banks are for. Behind the story of Myanmar’s brutal military leadership is a slow stream of defectors; our correspondent meets the support network they rely on. And cover songs muddle the notion of who can call it their tune.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Moonshooters

    19/01/2022 Duration: 31min

    This week Microsoft announced its biggest ever deal, spending $69bn on games publisher Activision Blizzard to advance its ambitions in gaming and the metaverse. The world’s most powerful tech companies are racing to splash their cash on frontier technologies. We crunch the numbers on where they are investing their billions and ask whether these new corporate moonshots will supercharge productivity or further entrench the giants’ dominance in the future.Rachana Shanbhogue hosts, with Kevin Scott, chief technology officer of Microsoft, and Margrethe Vestager, competition commissioner for the European Union. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Drilling into the numbers: ExxonMobil

    19/01/2022 Duration: 22min

    America’s biggest oil firm has long been recalcitrant on climate matters, so its new net-zero targets may seem surprising. We examine the substance of its pledges—and motivations. For an economist, tipping is an odd practice; whether you love it or hate it may be a question of control. And how unusual Novak Djokovic’s refusenik vaccine stance is among elite athletes. Additional audio courtesy of Tennis Australia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Havana syndrome

    18/01/2022 Duration: 39min

    New cases of Havana syndrome are baffling scientists. Alok Jha investigates the theories behind the mysterious malady plaguing Western diplomats. Are microwave weapons to blame, or could the illness have psychological origins?For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Through deny of a needle: vaccine mandates

    18/01/2022 Duration: 22min

    Austria is set to enact a bold policy of levying fines on the unvaccinated. We look at what is driving governments to such measures, and whether they will work. Japan’s shift in thinking about its growing elderly population holds lessons for countries set for a similar demographic shift. And why the Mormon church is struggling to retain its foreign converts.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The World Ahead: Following the money

    17/01/2022 Duration: 28min

    Inflation in America has reached its highest level in four decades. What is the outlook for 2022? Host Tom Standage asks former US treasury secretary Larry Summers. Meanwhile, China is pushing ahead with its plans for a “central bank digital currency”. How do such digital coins stack up against cryptocurrencies?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • But who’s counting? Voting rights in America

    17/01/2022 Duration: 23min

    Democrats will spend the week battling for a tightening of laws on casting votes; that will overshadow Republicans’ worrying push into how those votes are counted and certified. Earthquakes remain damnably unpredictable, but new research suggests a route to early-warning systems. And why hammams, the declining bathhouses of the Arab world, will cling on despite even the challenge of covid-19. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: January 17th 2022

    17/01/2022 Duration: 24min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, beware the bossy state, Britain’s party-animal prime minister (11:45) and, why America and China are one military accident away from disaster (18:00)  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: “Refund the police”

    14/01/2022 Duration: 41min

    After George Floyd’s murder protestors took to the streets, angry about racially-motivated brutality and discrimination. They urged authorities to “defund the police” and over 20 cities listened. But now, with rising murder rates, many of those same places are increasing investment in law enforcement. Can you “refund” and reform the police at the same time?  Mayor of Portland, Oregon Ted Wheeler tells us why his city is raising its police budget. We go back to a war on crime that’s been largely forgotten. And criminal justice reformer David Muhammad discusses the best ways to cut crime while also fixing policing.John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • His royal minus: Prince Andrew

    14/01/2022 Duration: 23min

    The queen’s second son has been stripped of his titles—an apparent bid to insulate the crown from his legal troubles. But dangers to the prince and to the monarchy remain. A blockade of Mali, intended to force a return to democratic order, may worsen security and entrench foreign influences. And the genre of “eco-horror” evolves alongside environment-driven anxieties.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Mandy Patinkin

    13/01/2022 Duration: 24min

    The Broadway legend has entertained audiences for four decades. He tells Anne McElvoy why he combines acting and activism and how he became a late-life TikTok sensation. And the star of “Homeland” reveals the personal story that inspired him to highlight Europe’s refugee crisis. Also, he gives us a burst of song from his days working with the late Stephen Sondheim. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In vino, veritas: Boris Johnson under fire

    13/01/2022 Duration: 22min

    While Britons followed covid strictures, the prime minister’s residence hosted boozy gatherings; widespread fury hints that his prevarications this time may be his last as leader. Religious institutions struggled during the pandemic, as all businesses did—so they are selling assets and courting new customers in innovative ways. And road rage is common, but in America it is getting decidedly deadlier. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: The bossy state

    12/01/2022 Duration: 34min

    Governments around the world are deciding it is time to bring big business to heel. Host Rachana Shanbhogue and The Economist’s business editor Jan Piotrowski explore the new age of state interventionism. A suite of old tools is being dusted off and reimagined—from a return to picking winners to turning the century-old global tax system on its head. The big state is back in business.With Oren Cass, director of American Compass; Sarah Miller, founder of the American Economic Liberties Project; Christiane Arndt-Bascle, head of regulatory performance at the OECD; and Professor Michael Devereux, director of the Centre for Business Taxes at Oxford University.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Not in the same class: America and schools

    12/01/2022 Duration: 22min

    The country’s children have missed more in-person learning than those in most of the rich world—to their cost. We ask why battles about schooling rage on. Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippine president, came to power on big promises; few were fulfilled. We ask about the skimpy legacy he leaves behind. And a look at the metaverse’s red-hot property market.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: The smartwatch will see you now

    11/01/2022 Duration: 42min

    A new tech boom is disrupting medicine. We investigate how wearable trackers, such as the Fitbit or Apple Watch, could transform health care. And, could the devices help prevent the next pandemic? Kenneth Cukier hosts. For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Talking out his asks: Putin’s NATO demands

    11/01/2022 Duration: 21min

    This week’s flurry of diplomacy aims to address what Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president, says he wants. He cannot get it. Does an invasion of Ukraine hang in the balance? At an annual jamboree of economists our correspondent finds an unusual focus on the future—in particular the future of home working. And why Cuba has an enormous trade in grey-market garlic.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The World Ahead: On the borderline

    10/01/2022 Duration: 17min

    China is unlikely to reopen its borders in 2022 as it continues its zero-covid policy. What will the long-term impact of the pandemic be on tourism and business travel? Meanwhile, the tourist map of South-East Asia will look very different in 2022 as the number of destinations adopting the “sandbox” model is set to grow. Tom Standage hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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