Berkeley Talks

Informações:

Synopsis

A podcast that features lectures, conversations, discussions and presentations from UC Berkeley. It's managed by the Office of Communications and Public Affairs.

Episodes

  • Scholars on using fantasy to reimagine Blackness

    29/07/2022 Duration: 01h31min

    A panel of scholars discusses UC Berkeley professor Darieck Scott's new book Keeping It Unreal: Black Queer Fantasy and Superhero Comics, which explores how fantasies of Black power and triumph in superhero comics and other genres create challenges to — and respite from — white supremacy and anti-Blackness.Listen to the discussion and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Graphic courtesy of the Othering and Belonging Institute. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • America wants gun control. Why doesn't it have it? (revisiting)

    15/07/2022 Duration: 01h26min

    "If having a gun really made you safer, then America would be one of the safest countries in the world. It’s not," said Gary Younge, a professor of sociology at Manchester University and former editor-at-large at the Guardian, in a lecture at UC Berkeley on March 4, 2020."Yet while Americans consistently favor more gun control," Younge continued, "gun laws have generally become more lax. That is partly due to the material resources of the gun lobby. But it is also about the central role of the gun, what it represents in the American narrative, and the inability of gun control advocates to develop a counter-narrative. ... When the national narrative is a story of conquering, dominating, force and power, a broad atavistic attachment to the gun can have more pull than narrower rational arguments to contain it."Listen to the lecture and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Detail of a mural by Kyle Holbrook and local youth in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Terence Faircloth via Flickr) See acast.com/privacy for privacy

  • ACLU leader on how voter suppression works

    01/07/2022 Duration: 59min

    Abdi Soltani, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Northern California, discussed on Feb. 18, 2022, key moments for voting rights and elections throughout U.S. history, current threats to voting that are unfolding across the country and work the ACLU is doing in California.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts.Music by Blue Dot Sessions.AP photo by Morry Gash. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • 'Mother Jones' editor on how the super-rich really live

    17/06/2022 Duration: 01h04min

    In Berkeley Talks episode 144, Mother Jones senior editor Michael Mechanic joins Berkeley Journalism professor David Barstow to discuss his new book, Jackpot: How the Super-Rich Really Live — and How Their Wealth Harms Us All.This conversation was streamed live on May 4, 2022.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts.Music by Blue Dot Sessions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Climate displacement and remaking the built environment

    03/06/2022 Duration: 01h26min

    In Berkeley Talks episode 143, a panel of UC Berkeley experts discuss climate displacement — what it means to abandon places, the power dynamics between the Global South and the Global North, challenges for both the sending and receiving regions, and what needs to happen to address this fast-growing problem.Panelists include faculty members from Berkeley's new cluster in climate equity and environmental justice:Maya Carrasquillo, civil and environmental engineeringDaniel Aldana Cohen, sociologyZoe Hamstead, city and regional planningDanielle Rivera, landscape architecture and environmental planning Moderated by Karen Chapple, director of Berkeley’s Urban Displacement Project and the University of Toronto’s School of CitiesThis April 25 event is part of Cal Performances' Illuminations: Place and Displacement series.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts.Photo by Pablo Paredes.Music by Blue Dot Sessions.  See acast.com/pr

  • Timnit Gebru on how change happens through collective action

    31/05/2022 Duration: 19min

    In a special episode, Timnit Gebru, founder and executive director of the Distributed Artificial Intelligence Research Institute and one of the most prominent researchers working in the field of ethics in artificial intelligence, gives the keynote address to the UC Berkeley School of Information graduating class on May 16. In the speech, Gebru touches on collective action, interconnectedness and the loneliness that may accompany standing on “the right side of history.”Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts.Photo by Noah Berger.Music by Blue Dot Sessions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Scholars on Roman Vishniac's photos of Jewish life before the Holocaust

    20/05/2022 Duration: 01h36min

    In Berkeley Talks episode 141, a panel of scholars discuss the work of Roman Vishniac, a renowned Russian American photographer who took thousands of photos over seven decades and across three continents. Although Vishniac’s genres were diverse, he’s best known for images that he took of Jewish life in Central and Eastern Europe before the Holocaust.“These photographs are distinguished by their epiphenomena, the life circumstances of their subjects and the narratives that have surrounded these images,” said Jeffrey Shandler, professor of Jewish studies at Rutgers University, at a two-day event in May presented by The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life in collaboration with Berkeley’s Center for Jewish Studies. “Shortly after these photographs were taken, most of the Jews they depict met a terrible fate during World War II. Those few who survived the Holocaust had to start their lives over in radically different circumstances."Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berke

  • An update on Public Service Loan Forgiveness

    06/05/2022 Duration: 01h01s

    In episode 140 of Berkeley Talks, a panel of student loan experts discuss the Public Service Loan Forgiveness waiver, the recently extended COVID payment pause and student debt cancellation.Panelists of this April 2022 talk included:Kat Welbeck, Student Borrower Protection CenterSuzanne Martindale, California Department of Financial Protection and InnovationKyra Taylor, National Consumer Law CenterModerated by Amanda Prasuhn, Berkeley Law Financial Aid OfficeListen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts.Music by Blue Dot Sessions.Photo by Elena Zhukova. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Damilola Ogunbiyi on driving an equitable energy transition

    22/04/2022 Duration: 01h23min

    In episode 139 of Berkeley Talks, Damilola Ogunbiyi, CEO and Special Representative of the U.N. Secretary General for Sustainable Energy for All, gives the UC Berkeley Energy and Resources Group's 28th Annual Lecture on Energy and Environment. In the March 31, 2022 talk, Ogunbiyi discusses how to drive a just, inclusive and equitable transition to affordable and sustainable energy for all, and how the Russia-Ukraine war is affecting energy markets around the world.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts.(Photo by Bamas100 via Wikimedia Commons)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sociologist Harry Edwards on sport in society

    08/04/2022 Duration: 01h13min

    In Berkeley Talks episode 138, Harry Edwards, a renowned sports activist and UC Berkeley professor emeritus of sociology, discusses the intersections of race and sport, athletes' struggle for definitional authority and the power of sport to change society."You can change society by changing people's perceptions and understandings of the games they play," said Edwards in March at a campus event sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues and Cal Athletics. "I'm saying whether it's race relations in America, whether it's relations between the United States and the Soviet Union and China, whether it's what's going on in South Africa with apartheid, you can leverage sport to change people's perceptions and understandings of those relationships. Change society by changing people's perceptions and understandings of the games they play."Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts.(Photo courtesy of Harry Edwards) See acast.com/pri

  • A Poetry for the People conversation

    25/03/2022 Duration: 01h23min

    The Department of African American Studies at UC Berkeley’s 2021-22 Critical Conversations speaker series is a celebration of the life and legacy of June Jordan, an award-winning poet, activist and longtime professor in the department.At Berkeley, Jordan founded the Poetry for the People program, where writers of all levels wrote and showcased their own poems, and taught poetry to other university students, high school students and community members.In this episode of Berkeley Talks, two Berkeley alumni and former students of Poetry for the People — Samiya Bashir, an associate professor of creative writing at Reed College, and Solmaz Sharif, an assistant professor of English at Arizona State University — read their work, share some of their favorite poems by Jordan, and discuss the Poetry for the People program and the impact it continues to have on their lives.The Feb. 28 conversation was moderated by Chiyuma Elliot, a poet and associate professor in the Department of African American Studies at Berkeley.Lis

  • Mapping the brain to understand health, aging and disease

    11/03/2022 Duration: 01h08min

    UC Berkeley psychology professor Jack Gallant discusses functional brain mapping for understanding health, aging and disease. The lecture, given on Jan. 20, was part of a series celebrating the 100th anniversary of Berkeley Psychology.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts.(Image by Milad Fakurian via Unsplash) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • UC Berkeley experts on the invasion of Ukraine

    28/02/2022 Duration: 01h29s

    In episode 135 of Berkeley Talks, UC Berkeley political scientist George Breslauer and economics professor Yuriy Gorodnichenko discuss Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine — what his motivations are and how they compare to Hitler's and Stalin's, if the invasion was avoidable and what should be done about it. Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.If you haven't already, follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The performance of labor

    25/02/2022 Duration: 01h30min

    Black feminist artists and cultural workers communally explore the questions of how the forms and methods of opera, surrealism, free jazz, poetry and dance help us communicate the concerns of radical Black feminisms. This Feb. 11 conversation was organized by the Black Studies Collaboratory, a collaborative initiative to address racial inequality through bold and unique humanities-based research projects.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.If you haven't already, follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How archaeology is used in comics

    11/02/2022 Duration: 52min

    Paulina Przystupa, a Ph.D. student at the University of New Mexico, discusses how archaeology inspires comic books and proposes ways archeologists can help build connections with the comic book community.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.If you haven't already, follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The EU in crisis

    28/01/2022 Duration: 54min

    The co-editors of The Palgrave Handbook of EU Crises discuss their research that explores the European Union's institutional and policy responses to crises across policy domains and institutions, including the Euro crisis, Brexit, the Ukraine crisis, the refugee crisis and the global health crisis caused by COVID-19."The EU has been surprisingly able to cope with crises of different kinds through adaptations, through reforms and through further integration," said Jarle Trondal, professor of public administration at the University of Agder in Norway, at the Jan. 13 event. "We argue that crises no longer pose existential threats to the EU as a political order."Panelists include:Akasemi Newsome, associate director of UC Berkeley's Institute of European Studies and executive director of the Peder Sather Center for Advanced StudyMarianne Riddervold, professor of political science at the Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences and senior fellow at UC Berkeley's Institute of European Studies Jarle Trondal,

  • 'Can we change nature — this time, to save it?'

    14/01/2022 Duration: 01h02min

    Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Elizabeth Kolbert in conversation with David Ackerly, dean of UC Berkeley's Rausser College of Natural Resources, and Geeta Anand, dean of Berkeley Journalism, as part of the 2021 Horace Albright Lecture in Conservation.Elizabeth Kolbert is the author of The Sixth Extinction, for which she won a Pulitzer Prize in 2015, and Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change. For her work at The New Yorker, where she’s a staff writer, she has received two National Magazine Awards and the Blake-Dodd Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In her 2021 book, Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future, Kolbert asks the question: “After doing so much damage, can we change nature — this time, to save it?”Listen to the episode and read the transcript on Berkeley News. (The page will go live Friday afternoon.) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Eva Paterson on transforming the nation's consciousness on race

    17/12/2021 Duration: 42min

    In episode 130 of Berkeley Talks, Eva Paterson, president and co-founder of the Equal Justice Society, talks in 2017 with Savala Nolan (then Savala Trepczynski), director of Berkeley Law's Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice, about when Paterson first realized the need for social justice, litigating implicit bias and why she loves — and hates — America. This conversation first appeared on Nolan's 2017 summer podcast series, Be the Change.Berkeley Talks is going on winter break. We'll be back with new episodes on Jan. 14, 2022.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News. (This page will go live Friday afternoon.)(The Atlantic photo by Edwin Tse) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why do leaves change color in the fall?

    03/12/2021 Duration: 58min

    Lewis Feldman, UC Berkeley professor of plant biology and executive director of the UC Botanical Garden, explores why some leaves appear to change color in the fall season — exhibiting reds, oranges and yellows — and the environmental influences that affect the brilliance of these colors. He also explains the evolutionary benefits of a tree losing its leaves.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News. (UC Berkeley photo by Keegan Houser) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Scholars reflect on new book, 'Atmospheres of Violence'

    19/11/2021 Duration: 01h33min

    A panel of artists, organizers and academics discuss UC Berkeley professor Eric Stanley's 2021 book that interrogates why, in a time when we're told LGBT rights are advancing in the U.S., anti-trans violence continues to rise.Panelists include:Angela Y. Davis, professor emerita, UC Santa CruzDean Spade, professor, Seattle University School of LawEric A. Stanley, associate professor, UC BerkeleyJules Gill-Peterson, associate professor, Johns Hopkins UniversityLaVelle Ridley, Ph.D. candidate, University of MichiganModerated by Courtney Desiree Morris, artist and assistant professor, UC BerkeleyThis Nov. 2, 2021 talk was co-sponsored by Berkeley's Othering & Belonging Institute, the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies, the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, the Center for Research on Social Change, the Center for Race and Gender and the American Cultures Center.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informatio

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