In Depth, Out Loud

Informações:

Synopsis

A selection of long form stories written by academic experts for The Conversation UK and read out loud for your listening pleasure.

Episodes

  • Durex condoms: how their teenage immigrant inventor was forgotten by history

    Durex condoms: how their teenage immigrant inventor was forgotten by history

    12/02/2021 Duration: 24min

    This episode of The Conversation’s In Depth Out Loud podcast features the story of Lucian Landau, the forgotten man who invented the technology that made Durex boom. Jessica Borge, Digital Collections (Scholarship) Manager at King’s College London Archives and Research Collections and a Visiting Fellow in Digital Humanities at the School of Advanced Study, explains her research into who actually invented Durex condoms.She discovered that the technology behind Durex was invented by Lucian Landau, a Polish teenager living in Highbury and studying rubber technology at the former Northern Polytechnic (now London Metropolitan University). His story is fascinating. You can read the text version of this in-depth article here. The audio version is read by Adrienne Walker in partnership with Noa, the audio journalism platform.This story came out of a project at The Conversation called Insights supported by Research England. You can read more stories in the series here. The music in In Depth Out Loud is Night Caves, by

  • Two doctors on the frontline of Liverpools second wave

    Two doctors on the frontline of Liverpool's second wave

    14/12/2020 Duration: 17min

    This episode of The Conversation’s In Depth Out Loud podcast features a report from two doctors on the frontline of the second wave of coronavirus in Liverpool.Tom Wingfield, an infectious diseases physician at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and the University of Liverpool, and Miriam Taegtmeyer, professor of global health at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, describe what it’s like for healthcare workers who continue to put their lives and those of their families on the line.They set out the problems they and their colleagues are facing around the country, some lessons we might be able to learn from the first wave, and some positive developments which will make the future a little brighter.You can read the text version of this in-depth article here. The audio version is read by Megan Clement and produced by Gemma Ware.This story came out of a project at The Conversation called Coronavirus Insights supported by Research England. The music is Night Caves, by Lee Rosevere.In Depth Out Loud is made b

  • Charles Dickens: the truth about his death and burial

    Charles Dickens: the truth about his death and burial

    08/06/2020 Duration: 28min

    This episode of The Conversation’s In Depth Out Loud podcast, features the work of Leon Litvack at Queen’s University Belfast on what happened after the death of Charles Dickens.His new research has uncovered the never-before-explored areas of the great author’s sudden death on June 9 1870, and his subsequent burial.Dickens’s death created an early predicament for his family. Where was he to be buried? Near his home (as he would have wished) or in that great public pantheon, Poet’s Corner in Westminster Abbey (which was clearly against his wishes)? But two ambitious men put their own interests ahead of the great writer and his family in an act of institutionally-sanctioned bodysnatching.You can read the text version of this in depth article here. The audio version is read by Michael Parker and edited by Gemma Ware.This story came out of a project at The Conversation called Insights. Sponsored by Research England, our Insights team generate in depth articles derived from interdisciplinary research. You can rea

  • Lockdown lessons from the history of solitude

    Lockdown lessons from the history of solitude

    20/05/2020 Duration: 22min

    This episode of The Conversation’s In Depth Out Loud podcast, features the work of David Vincent, historian at the Open University. He has spent the last few years looking into how people in the past managed to balance community ties and solitary behaviours. With the coronavirus crisis forcing many to self-isolate and limiting our sociability, this has never seemed more relevant.Solitude used to be restricted to enclosed religious orders and was thus a privileged experience of a male elite. It was treated with a mixture of fear and respect. Change was only set in motion by the Reformation and the Enlightenment, when new ideologies took hold and solitude slowly became something that anyone could acceptably seek from time to time. Most people in the West are now used to some regular form of solitude – but the reality of lockdown is making this experience far more extreme.The history of solitude has lessons for us in differentiating between being alone and feeling lonely. Similarly, it offers lessons for navigat

  • What will the world be like after coronavirus? Four possible futures

    What will the world be like after coronavirus? Four possible futures

    29/04/2020 Duration: 26min

    In this episode of The Conversation’s In Depth Out Loud podcast, Simon Mair, Research Fellow in Ecological Economics at the University of Surrey’s Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity, says we could use the coronavirus crisis to rebuild, produce something better and more humane. But we may slide into something worse.The responses to the COVID-19 pandemic are simply the amplification of the dynamic that drives other social and ecological crises: the prioritisation of one type of value over others. This dynamic has played a large part in driving global responses to COVID-19. So as responses to the virus evolve, how might our economic futures develop?From an economic perspective, there are four possible futures: a descent into barbarism, a robust state capitalism, a radical state socialism, and a transformation into a big society built on mutual aid. Versions of all of these futures are perfectly possible, if not equally desirable.You can read the text version of this in depth article here. The

  • How to model a pandemic

    How to model a pandemic

    03/04/2020 Duration: 16min

    In this episode of The Conversation’s In Depth Out Loud podcast, Christian Yates, senior lecturer in mathematical biology at the University of Bath, looks at how to model a pandemic.With basic mathematical models, researchers can begin to forecast the progression of diseases and understand the effect of interventions on the way diseases spread. With more complex models, we can start to answer questions about how to efficiently allocate limited resources or tease out the consequences of public health interventions, like closing pubs and banning gatherings.Insights from mathematical modelling are vital to ensure that authorities can prevent as many deaths as possible. As the coronavirus pandemic escalates, here’s a look inside the modelling that experts use to try and stay one step ahead of the virus.You can read the text version of this in depth article here. The audio version is read by Holly Squire and edited by Gemma Ware.This story came out of a project at The Conversation called Insights. Sponsored by Res

  • Ritalin: a biography

    Ritalin: a biography

    21/02/2020 Duration: 22min

    In this episode of The Conversation’s In Depth Out Loud podcast, we bring you the history of Ritalin by Matthew Smith, professor in health history at the University of Strathclyde.Just over 75 years ago, a new stimulant drug with the generic name of methylphenidate was born in the Swiss lab of chemical company Ciba. Like many drugs, its therapeutic purpose was unclear. But these were the days a scientist could take a drug home and test it on their spouse, which is exactly what Ciba scientist Leandro Panizzon did. Panizzon’s wife, Rita, reported that the drug gave her tennis game a real fillip. And so Panizzon originally named the drug Ritaline in his wife’s honour.Over the next three-quarters of a century, Ritalin would go on to wear many hats, including antipsychotic, tonic for worn-out housewives, drug to treat disruptive children, street drug and smart drug.But what does the future hold?You can read the text version of this in depth article here. The audio version is read by Annabel Bligh and edited by Lau

  • How a Frenchman born 150 years ago inspired the extreme nationalism behind Brexit and Donald Trump

    How a Frenchman born 150 years ago inspired the extreme nationalism behind Brexit and Donald Trump

    04/02/2020 Duration: 25min

    Welcome back to The Conversation’s In Depth Out Loud podcast, the audio version of selected long form stories based on cutting edge research written by academic experts.This episode is based on two years of in-depth historical analysis by Pablo de Orellana and Nick Michelsen at King’s College London.After marching in the streets of Paris with the militant far-right group Génération Identitaire they met Charles, a young French man terrified by what he sees as the degeneration of Western culture.Nationalists such as Charles often refer to themselves as the New Right, or read thinkers who do. They are not all as radical as he is, but a diverse grouping of politicians share the stream of New Right ideas. These include Donald Trump, Brexiteers like Jacob Rees-Mogg, European nationalists like Marine Le Pen, Matteo Salvini and Viktor Orbán, and newcomers such as Santiago Abascal and his Vox party in Spain.But this research explains why the comparisons of the New Right with fascism are inaccurate and unhelpful. And t

  • Infertility through the ages, and how IVF helped change the way we think about it – podcast

    Infertility through the ages, and how IVF helped change the way we think about it – podcast

    25/07/2018 Duration: 17min

    An audio version of a long read article on the history of infertility, 40 years after the first baby was born via IVF. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Decolonise science: time to end another imperial era – podcast

    Decolonise science: time to end another imperial era – podcast

    27/06/2018 Duration: 22min

    This episode of the In Depth Out Loud podcast outlines the importance of finding a way to remove the inequalities promoted by modern science. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How the humble potato fuelled the rise of liberal capitalism – podcast

    How the humble potato fuelled the rise of liberal capitalism – podcast

    30/05/2018 Duration: 18min

    An audio version of an in depth article about the 18th century Enlightenment thinkers who promoted the potato as a way to build a healthy and productive society. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How transhumanism’s faithful follow it blindly into a future for the elite – podcast

    How transhumanism’s faithful follow it blindly into a future for the elite – podcast

    02/05/2018 Duration: 22min

    This is the audio version of an in depth article from The Conversation, which explores the ethics of transhumanism. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Antisemitism: how the origins of history’s oldest hatred still hold sway today – podcast

    Antisemitism: how the origins of history’s oldest hatred still hold sway today – podcast

    19/04/2018 Duration: 20min

    The audio version of an in depth article from The Conversation, which explores how antisemitism today is carved from and sustained by powerful precedents and inherited stereotypes. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The story of the Novichok nerve agents – podcast

    The story of the Novichok nerve agents – podcast

    20/03/2018 Duration: 19min

    An audio version of an in depth article on the story of how the nerve agent used in an attack on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal was developed. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The heartbreaking story of the flying mathematicians of World War I – podcast

    The heartbreaking story of the flying mathematicians of World War I – podcast

    08/03/2018 Duration: 16min

    The audio version of a long read on the daring mathematicians who took to the skies to help make early air travel safer. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Africa’s missing Ebola outbreaks – podcast

    Africa’s missing Ebola outbreaks – podcast

    21/02/2018 Duration: 18min

    The audio version of a long read on the historical mistakes and cover ups that hampered the response to the devastating Ebola outbreak of 2014. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why life expectancy in Britain has fallen so much that a million years of life could disappear by 2058 – podcast

    Why life expectancy in Britain has fallen so much that a million years of life could disappear by 2058 – podcast

    07/02/2018 Duration: 20min

    The audio version of a long read on stalling life expectancy in the UK. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The IQ test wars: why screening for intelligence is still so controversial – podcast

    The IQ test wars: why screening for intelligence is still so controversial – podcast

    24/01/2018 Duration: 14min

    Since its invention, the IQ test has generated strong arguments in support of – and against – its use. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How slimming became an obsession with women in post-war Britain – podcast

    How slimming became an obsession with women in post-war Britain – podcast

    10/01/2018 Duration: 17min

    The latest episode of The Conversation's In Depth, Out Loud podcast, an audio version of selected long-form stories. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Buggery, bribery and a committee: the story of how gay sex was decriminalised in Britain – podcast

    Buggery, bribery and a committee: the story of how gay sex was decriminalised in Britain – podcast

    20/12/2017 Duration: 16min

    Listen to the fascinating in-depth story of the decriminalisation of gay sex in Britain. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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