Airtalk

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Synopsis

Join Larry Mantle weekdays for lively and in-depth discussions of Los Angeles and Southern California news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts and more. More AirTalk at www.kpcc.org.

Episodes

  • AirTalk Episode Wednesday April 7, 2021

    AirTalk Episode Wednesday April 7, 2021

    07/04/2021 Duration: 01h42min

    Today on AirTalk, we talk about California's plan in lifting most COVID-19 restrictions on businesses by June 15. Also on the show, we discuss the impact of a potential boycott on the Beijing Olympic Games; go over the latest COVID-19 news; and more.

  • Impact Of Potential China Olympic Games Boycott On LA’s Economy, Plus A 1980 Moscow Boycott History Lesson

    Impact Of Potential China Olympic Games Boycott On LA’s Economy, Plus A 1980 Moscow Boycott History Lesson

    07/04/2021 Duration: 23min

    China’s government warned Washington on Wednesday not to boycott next year’s Winter Olympics in Beijing after the Biden administration said it was talking with allies about a joint approach to complaints of human rights abuses. A Foreign Ministry spokesperson rejected accusations of abuses against ethnic minorities in the Xinjiang region. He warned of an unspecified “robust Chinese response” to a potential Olympics boycott. Human rights groups are protesting China’s hosting of the games, due to start in February 2022. They have urged a boycott or other measures to call attention to accusations of Chinese abuses against Uyghurs, Tibetans and residents of Hong Kong. The U.S. State Department suggested an Olympic boycott was among the possibilities but a senior official said later a boycott has not been discussed. The International Olympic Committee and the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee have said in the past they oppose boycotts. We discuss the potential repercussions of a U.S. boycott of the China g

  • Implication Of New Research That Grew Mouse Embryos In Artificial Womb

    Implication Of New Research That Grew Mouse Embryos In Artificial Womb

    07/04/2021 Duration: 17min

    According to a recent study published in Nature, scientists from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel were able to grow mouse embryos in an artificial womb for several days.  Though the mice have yet to be fully gestated in a robotic womb, this research has some interesting potential applications. According to the New York Times, this experimentation could lead to a great understanding of early development and could have applications in fertility as well. And though it may seem far off in the sci-fi future, this also opens the door for the potential for human embryos to be carried to term outside a human body.  We sit down with New York Times medical reporter Gina Kolata and developmental biologist Paul Tesar to discuss the research and its potential implications.  Guests:  Gina Kolata, medical reporter at the New York Times, where her recent piece is “Scientists Grow Mouse Embryos in a Mechanical Womb”; she tweets @ginakolata  Paul Tesar, professor of genetics and developmental biologist at Case

  • COVID-19 California Sets Sights On Full Reopening In June

    COVID-19 California Sets Sights On Full Reopening In June

    07/04/2021 Duration: 33min

    In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Tim Brewer from UCLA. Today’s topics include:  AstraZeneca vaccine paused in adolescents after blot clot concerns  Double mutant variant found in California More than 40% of new cases coming out of five states  Young Angelenos head to Bakersfield for vaccine Study: 1 in 3 develop neuropsychiatric conditions after COVID-19 U.S Army developing vaccine, begins testing in humans   Most children with inflammatory syndrome had mild COVID-19 Guest:  Timothy Brewer, M.D., epidemiologist and professor of medicine at UCLA’s school of public health; has served on the advisory boards of the World Health Organization, the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention

  • California To Lift Most COVID-19 Workplace, Biz Restrictions By Mid-June

    California To Lift Most COVID-19 Workplace, Biz Restrictions By Mid-June

    07/04/2021 Duration: 27min

    California plans to lift most coronavirus restrictions on businesses and workplaces June 15, with officials saying enough people should be vaccinated by then to allow for life to almost get back to a pre-pandemic normal. The mask mandate in the nation’s most populated state will stay in effect, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Tuesday, and he cautioned that California will reopen more widely in mid-June only if vaccine supply is sufficient and hospitalization rates stay stable and low. Still, the Democratic governor, who has overseen some of the most restrictive pandemic rules in the country, said it was time to forge ahead, with 20 million vaccines administered in California to date. The announcement signals an end date to more than a year of isolation after California resisted reopening too quickly even while other states pushed ahead. “We can confidently say by June 15 that we can start to open up as business as usual, subject to ongoing mask-wearing and ongoing vigilance,” Newsom said. “So this is a big day.” Th

  • AirTalk Episode Tuesday March 6, 2021

    AirTalk Episode Tuesday March 6, 2021

    06/04/2021 Duration: 01h42min

    Today on AirTalk, we discuss the latest COVID-19 headlines. Also on the show, we break down Georgia's new voting law; discuss the legal and logistical questions of universities requiring college students to be vaccinated before stepping foot on campus; and more.

  • Some Universities Are Requiring Vaccinations Before Students And Staff Return To Campus What Are The Legal And Logistics Questions

    Some Universities Are Requiring Vaccinations Before Students And Staff Return To Campus What Are The Legal And Logistics Questions

    06/04/2021 Duration: 15min

    Last week, Cornell University became the latest in a growing pool of higher education institutions to announce that COVID-19 vaccinations will be required for students to return to campus. “Medical and religious exemptions will be accommodated, but the expectation will be that our campuses and classrooms will overwhelmingly consist of vaccinated individuals, greatly reducing the risk of infection for all,” according to a statement from President Martha E. Pollack and Provost Michael I. Kotlikoff. Rutgers University, which also recently announced a vaccine requirement, will provide exceptions. Students taking online courses will not be required to be vaccinated. Legal experts generally expect that colleges and universities can safely require students to be vaccinated, but there are a couple caveats. For one thing, the vaccines are under emergency use authorization, and access could be an issue— but by fall, these same vaccines could also receive full approval.  Today on AirTalk, we’re learning more about wha

  • How Researchers Were Able To Plant Memories In People’s Heads (Before Helping To Root Them Out)

    How Researchers Were Able To Plant Memories In People’s Heads (Before Helping To Root Them Out)

    06/04/2021 Duration: 16min

    It might sound like a concept out of Chris Nolan’s 2010 box-office-hit-turned-cultural-touchstone “Inception,” but researchers in Germany and the United Kingdom were recently able to successfully plant memories in the minds of study participants before going back and helping the participants identify and root out the memories. In the study, researchers did interviews in which they convinced test subjects that they had experienced events in their childhood that they had not actually experienced, for example that they had been in a car accident when they hadn’t, or that they’d been separated from their family when they actually had not. The researchers then used different interviewing techniques to bring the participants back through their memories and help them realize that they were false. While the study was conducted in a controlled setting and it’s difficult to say given its size how applicable the findings are on an individual level, it does back up pre-existing research about how moldable human memories

  • We Break Down Georgia’s New Voting Law And Talk Political, Economic Impacts

    We Break Down Georgia’s New Voting Law And Talk Political, Economic Impacts

    06/04/2021 Duration: 20min

    The sweeping rewrite of Georgia’s election rules represents the first big set of changes since former President Donald Trump’s repeated, baseless claims of fraud following his presidential loss to Joe Biden. Georgia has been at the center of that storm. Trump zeroed in on his loss in the state, even as two Democrats won election to the U.S. Senate in January, flipping control of the chamber to their party. The 98-page measure that was signed into law Thursday by Republican Gov. Brian Kemp makes numerous changes to how elections will be administered, including a new photo ID requirement for voting absentee by mail. Republican supporters say the law is needed to restore confidence in Georgia’s elections. Democrats say it will restrict voting access, especially for voters of color. Meanwhile, Major League Baseball decided to pull this summer’s All-Star Game from Georgia over this new law. The state’s governor Brian Kemp vowed to defend the measure, saying “free and fair elections” are worth any threats, boyco

  • COVID-19: Vaccine Eligibility Expansions, Why CA’s Contact Tracing Efforts Didn’t Go As Planned And More

    COVID-19: Vaccine Eligibility Expansions, Why CA’s Contact Tracing Efforts Didn’t Go As Planned And More

    06/04/2021 Duration: 33min

    In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Kimberly Shriner, infectious disease specialist at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena. Today’s topics include:  Biden likely to move up vaccine eligibility for all Americans Riverside, Calif. expands vaccine eligibility to 16 and up  Are variants stalling progress in the U.S.? Reasons Calif. contact tracing didn’t go as planned Are people venturing out too soon?  Are social interactions now causing anxiety? Guest:  Kimberly Shriner, M.D., infectious disease specialist at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena

  • After A Year Of Distancing And Lockdowns, We’re Anxious. How Are You Coping With Social Anxiety?

    After A Year Of Distancing And Lockdowns, We’re Anxious. How Are You Coping With Social Anxiety?

    06/04/2021 Duration: 18min

    As more people get a COVID-19 vaccine, the more it feels like there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. The good news: the vaccines are working! So that means things can slowly start to reopen and return to normal. While that’s definitely exciting news, why are so many of us feeling anxious?  A recent survey from the American Psychological Association found that nearly half of adults are concerned about returning to normal interactions. Experts say it’s only natural to feel some sort of social anxiety after spending a year in isolation. And health anxieties, which we’ve likely all had over the last year, only make the anxiety worse. The main thing to know is that, just like you weren’t the only one locked away in quarantine, you’re not the only one feeling anxious. Today on AirTalk, we want to hear how you’re feeling? Have you ventured out only to feel uncomfortable or anxious? What was your experience? How did you react? How are you coping? Give us a call at 866-893-5722 to share your thoughts and join the

  • AirTalk Episode Monday April 5, 2021

    AirTalk Episode Monday April 5, 2021

    05/04/2021 Duration: 01h42min

    Today on AirTalk, we discuss the latest COVID-19 news. Also on the show, we analyze Biden's infrastructure plan; talk about what's going on in the airline industry; and more.

  • The Greatest Live Musical Performance You’ve Ever Seen

    The Greatest Live Musical Performance You’ve Ever Seen

    05/04/2021 Duration: 17min

    For many live music lovers and frequent concert-goers, there’s always that one performance that was better than all the others. Maybe it was the first time you finally saw your all-time favorite artist up close and personal in a packed venue, or maybe it was a more intimate performance with a smaller audience and venue. For Larry Mantle, it was a night at a Chicago cocktail lounge called The Green Mill featuring jazz organist Tony Monaco and his group. Larry said “I've seen Miles [Davis], Ella [Fitzgerald], Dizzy [Gillespie], Carmen McRae, Sarah Vaughn, Ray Charles, Freddie Hubbard, etc. It was a night with a lesser-known organist from Ohio that provided my  ‘Elton John levitating-like’ experience.’” What is the greatest live musical performance you’ve ever seen? You know, the one that gave you the Elton John levitating-like experience? Call and share your story at 866-893-5722.

  • How Southern Californians Celebrated Easter and Passover, And How They’re Preparing To Celebrate Ramadan

    How Southern Californians Celebrated Easter and Passover, And How They’re Preparing To Celebrate Ramadan

    05/04/2021 Duration: 17min

    Sunday marked days of celebration for followers of multiple faiths as Christians across Southern California and the world observed Easter and Jews celebrated the end of the Passover holiday. And for members of the Muslim faith, the start of Ramadan is just around the corner on April 12th. Despite more and more people being vaccinated, these religious holidays, all of which are rooted in gathering together with family, friends and fellow worshippers, still happened in the shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic. And while there is likely less apprehension about gathering to celebrate the holidays this year, Easter, Passover and Ramadan celebrations in 2021 may still look a little different than before the pandemic. Today on AirTalk, we’d like to hear from members of our listening audience who celebrated Easter or Passover this weekend, or who will be celebrating Ramadan starting next week. How did you celebrate, or how are you planning your celebration this year? Join our live conversation by calling us at 866-893-57

  • As More People Consider Travel Under Updated CDC Guidance, What’s Happening In The Airline Industry

    As More People Consider Travel Under Updated CDC Guidance, What’s Happening In The Airline Industry

    05/04/2021 Duration: 15min

    As more Americans receive a COVID-19 vaccination, people are growing even more tempted to travel. Airlines certainly hope that’s as some add various domestic routes in an effort to reach folks who are ready to climb aboard this summer. According to CNBC, United Airlines has added dozens of nonstop flights from the midwest to coastal areas. The company also announced its planning to hire hundreds of pilots next month as it expects to recover from the devastating impacts of the coronavirus pandemic over the last year. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control released new guidance on Friday for traveling which says fully vaccinated folks can travel at low risk to themselves. The highly anticipated guidance came with mixed messages from the head of the CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky, who says traveling still isn’t advised as cases are rising in parts of the country. Today on AirTalk, we check in on the airline industry as it tries to bounce back. We also want to hear from you! How do you feel about returning to

  • COVID-19 AMA Potential Of Fourth Wave, Live Events, Travel And More

    COVID-19 AMA Potential Of Fourth Wave, Live Events, Travel And More

    05/04/2021 Duration: 34min

    In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with UC Berkeley’s Dr. Arthur Reingold. Topics today include: Michigan, New York and New England seem to be facing a fourth wave. Might it hit California? Indoor events can resume in California (with limitations) mid-April The effects of in-person Easter celebrations  Can employers or universities force staff and students to get vaccinated? New CDC travel guidance Some airlines resisting responsibility for vaccine passport A new formulation of COVID vaccine that can be produced in chicken eggs enters clinical trials After mistake at Baltimore, Maryland plant ruined J&J vaccines, the Biden administration will put J&J in charge  Guest:  Arthur Reingold, M.D., professor of epidemiology and Head of the Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health

  • Economists Analyze Biden’s $2.3 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

    Economists Analyze Biden’s $2.3 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

    05/04/2021 Duration: 16min

    Infrastructure was a road to nowhere for former presidents Donald Trump and Barack Obama. But Joe Biden believes he can use it to drive America to the future after a dozen years of false starts. The trip is unlikely to be smooth. Biden’s $2.3 trillion infrastructure package, released Wednesday, would go well beyond the usual commitments to roads and bridges to touch almost every part of the country. It’s a down payment on combating climate change, a chance to take on racial inequities, an expansion of broadband, an investment in manufacturing and a reorienting of corporate taxes to pay for everything. To succeed where his predecessors stalled, Biden will have to navigate a conflicting set of political forces with winners and losers all around. The president resisted calls by business groups to pay for his plan with higher gas taxes and tolls, since the costs would be borne by working Americans and Biden had promised no tax hikes on anyone making less than $400,000. That’s according to an administration offi

  • AirTalk Episode Friday April 2, 2021

    AirTalk Episode Friday April 2, 2021

    02/04/2021 Duration: 01h41min

    Today on AirTalk, we discuss the latest COVID-19 news. Also on the show, we talk about California's dry weather; talk with KPCC film critics about this weekend's movie releases; and more.

  • Final Four What To Expect Ahead Of UCLA Versus Gonzaga

    Final Four What To Expect Ahead Of UCLA Versus Gonzaga

    02/04/2021 Duration: 07min

    As he basked in the glow of a win over Michigan, UCLA coach Mick Cronin was asked whether he thought he had the kind of team in his second season in Westwood to make a Final Four run. Cronin thought for a moment about five-star prospect Daishen Nix, who reneged on his commitment to the Bruins for the G League. Then he thought about the season-ending knee injury to Chris Smith, his top returning player, and backup forward Jalen Hill’s departure midway through the season for personal reasons. With those three? Maybe. Without them? “Hell no,” Cronin said. Yet here they are. One of college basketball’s traditional powers, relegated to underdog status throughout the tournament, marching through heavyweights (Michigan State), upstarts (Abilene Christian and BYU), the flavor of the day (Alabama) and the team everyone had pegged as a championship contender since January (Michigan).Two of the wins in overtime. Two more white-knucklers. Only one in which the Bruins were given a chance. Next up is the overall No. 1 s

  • Californias Dry Weather Is Bad News For Wildfires And Water Supply

    California's Dry Weather Is Bad News For Wildfires And Water Supply

    02/04/2021 Duration: 09min

    It's now April, which means that California's rainy season has officially come to an end. And because we're not likely to see much more precipitation until next winter, it's the perfect opportunity to reflect on where we're at in terms of water throughout the state, and what the rest of the year is going to look like. In short: it's bad. We're now officially entering our second year of worsening drought conditions after a paltry showing of rain and snow back in 2020. That left us in a critically dry position in the fall, with 84% of the state experiencing some level of drought. And because of the disappointing showing of precipitation over the past four months, that's now spread to 91% of the state, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. The credit for any sort of moisture this rainy season belongs to only a few storms, most notably the late January atmospheric river, which was responsible for 50% of this year's all important snowpack. Another example of how crucial the storm systems are here. That said, it

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