London Review Bookshop Podcasts

Informações:

Synopsis

Twice a week or so, the London Review Bookshop becomes a miniature auditorium in which authors talk about and read from their work, meet their readers and engage in lively debate about the burning topics of the day. Fortunately, for those of you who weren't able to make it to one of our talks, were able to make it but couldn't get a ticket, or did in fact make it but weren't paying attention and want to listen again, we make a recording of everything that happens. So now you can hear Alan Bennett, Hilary Mantel, Iain Sinclair, Jarvis Cocker, Jenny Diski, Patti Smith (yes, she sings) and many, many more, wherever, and whenever you like.

Episodes

  • Chris Power and Alex Clark: A Lonely Man

    Chris Power and Alex Clark: A Lonely Man

    12/05/2021 Duration: 56min

    Chris Power’s first novel A Lonely Man (Faber) is a powerful, menacing exploration of the nature of truth, fabrication and identity. ‘If you're a fan of existential crises’ writes Jon McGregor, ‘family dramas, Putin-era paranoias, and Bolaño-style multiplicities, and want to see them woven into one taut novel, you're in the right place.’ Chris Power was in conversation about A Lonely Man with the critic Alex Clark.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Rebecca Solnit and Mary Beard: ‘Recollections of My Nonexistence’

    Rebecca Solnit and Mary Beard: ‘Recollections of My Nonexistence’

    05/05/2021 Duration: 57min

    Beginning in San Francisco in 1981, the era of punk and nascent gay pride, Rebecca Solnit’s latest book Recollections of My Non-Existence (Granta) is a powerful memoir of growing both as a woman and an artist, drawing on the powers of literature, activism and solidarity in the face of an apparently unbreachable patriarchy. The struggle to find a voice and to find a way to make that voice heard are brilliantly captured and dissected by one of feminism’s, and indeed the world’s, foremost thinkers. Rebecca Solnit was in conversation about her life and work with historian Mary Beard, whose most recent book is Women & Power: A Manifesto. Both of our speakers are regular contributors to the pages of the LRB.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Rachel Kushner and Hal Foster: The Hard Crowd

    Rachel Kushner and Hal Foster: The Hard Crowd

    28/04/2021 Duration: 01h02min

    Already well-known for her novels – Telex from Cuba, The Flamethrowers, The Mars Room – Rachel Kushner has over the past two decades been writing essays, reviews and reportage as insightful and surprising as her fiction. In The Hard Crowd (Jonathan Cape) she has selected 19 pieces, covering diverse topics: art, literature, music, politics with essays on Marguerite Duras, Jeff Koons, wildcat strikes, a visit to a Palestinian refugee Camp and the music scene of her hometown San Francisco.She talks about her work with art critic and frequent contributor to the LRB Professor Hal Foster.Buy the books here.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Joshua Cohen and Jon Day: Moving Kings

    Joshua Cohen and Jon Day: Moving Kings

    21/04/2021 Duration: 51min

    Joshua Cohen, one of Granta magazines ‘Best Young American Writers’ for 2017, was at the shop to read from and talk about his latest novel Moving Kings, published by Fitzcarraldo. Described by James Wood in the New Yorker as ‘A Jewish Sopranos… burly with particularities and vibrant with voice… utterly engrossing, full of passionate sympathy’, Moving Kings interweaves the housing crisis in contemporary New York with the history of conflict in the Middle East. Joshua Cohen was in conversation with Jon Day, lecturer in English at King's College, London and LRB contributor.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • John Boughton and Owen Hatherley: Municipal Dreams

    John Boughton and Owen Hatherley: Municipal Dreams

    14/04/2021 Duration: 01h03min

    From this 2018 event: In Municipal Dreams (Verso), John Boughton charts the often surprising story of council housing in Britain, from the slum clearances of the Victorian age through to the Grenfell Tower disaster. It’s a history packed with incident – with utopians, visionaries and charlatans, with visionary planners and corrupt officials – and Boughton combines it with an architectural tour of some of the best remaining examples, as well as some of the more ordinary places that millions of people have come to call home. He's in conversation about his book with Owen Hatherley, architectural historian and author of, most recently, The Ministry of Nostalgia.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Comic Timing: Holly Pester, Vahni Capildeo and Rachael Allen

    Comic Timing: Holly Pester, Vahni Capildeo and Rachael Allen

    07/04/2021 Duration: 01h05min

    Holly Pester's debut collection, Comic Timing (Granta), is disorienting, radical and extremely funny; Pester has a background in sound art and performance, having worked with the Womens' Library, the BBC and the Wellcome Collection, and is an unmissable reader of her own work. She read from Comic Timing and was in conversation with Vahni Capildeo, whose most recent collection is Skin Can Hold (Carcanet, 2019), and Rachael Allen, poetry editor at Granta and author of Kingdomland (Faber, 2019).  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Paul Spooner and Rosemary Hill: Cabaret Mechanical Theatre

    Paul Spooner and Rosemary Hill: Cabaret Mechanical Theatre

    01/04/2021 Duration: 55min

    Having an engineer as a father and an art school education, Paul Spooner became, predictably, a school-teacher, then a lorry driver. A chance meeting with mechanical model-maker Peter Markey in Cornwall led him to discover his true métier – the almost extinct profession of automatist, or maker of automata. Since then he has been relentlessly making mechanical playthings, mostly of wood, some of them not, mostly small, some of them not, all of them intricately engineered, eccentrically beautiful and endlessly fascinating.He is in conversation about his work with Rosemary Hill, architectural historian and contributing editor at the London Review of Books. She first encountered Paul Spooner's work at Cabaret Mechanical Theatre in Covent Garden in the 1980s and has admired it ever since. Her books include God's Architect, a biography of A W N Pugin, and Stonehenge.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Patricia Lockwood and John Lanchester: No One Is Talking About This

    Patricia Lockwood and John Lanchester: No One Is Talking About This

    24/03/2021 Duration: 54min

    Patricia Lockwood was in conversation about her new book, No One Is Talking About This (and a lot else besides) with fellow LRB contributing editor, John Lanchester.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • On Brigid Brophy: Bidisha, Terry Castle and Eley Williams

    On Brigid Brophy: Bidisha, Terry Castle and Eley Williams

    17/03/2021 Duration: 57min

    Brigid Brophy (1929-95) was a fearlessly original novelist, essayist, critic and political campaigner, championing gay marriage, pacifism, vegetarianism and prison reform. Her many acclaimed novels include Hackenfeller’s Ape, The King of a Rainy Country, Flesh, The Finishing Touch, In Transit, and The Snow Ball – which Faber reissued at the end of last year – as well as critical studies of Mozart, Aubrey Beardsley and Ronald Firbank, among other subjects. She also wrote about Mozart for the LRB, and contributed 19 other unforgettable pieces in the paper’s first years, on subjects ranging from Michelangelo to Germaine Greer, animal cruelty to structuralism.Eley Williams, who wrote the foreword for the new edition of The Snow Ball, is in conversation with Terry Castle and Bidisha about Brophy the essayist and novelist, Brophy then and now.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lauren Oyler and Olivia Sudjic: Fake Accounts

    Lauren Oyler and Olivia Sudjic: Fake Accounts

    10/03/2021 Duration: 55min

    Lauren Oyler was talking abou her first novel, Fake Accounts, with the writer Olivia Sudjic, who has described it as 'Savage and shrewd, destined to go viral. If the world does end soon I'll be glad that I read it'.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • André Aciman and Brian Dillon: Homo Irrealis

    André Aciman and Brian Dillon: Homo Irrealis

    02/03/2021 Duration: 54min

    André Aciman talked to Brian Dillon about his latest book, Homo Irrealis (Faber and Faber), a collection of essays on subjects as diverse as Freud, W.G.Sebald, the films of Eric Rohmer and the cityscapes of Alexandria and St Petersburg.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • ‘The Lark Ascending’: Richard King and Luke Turner

    ‘The Lark Ascending’: Richard King and Luke Turner

    24/02/2021 Duration: 54min

    In The Lark Ascending (Faber) Richard King, author of Original Rockers and How Soon is Now?, explores how Britain's history and identity have been shaped by the mysterious relationship between music and nature. From the far west of Wales to the Thames Estuary and the Suffolk shoreline, taking in Brian Eno, Kate Bush, Boards of Canada, Dylan Thomas, Gavin Bryars, Greenham Common and the Kinder Scout Mass Trespass, The Lark Ascending listens to the land and the music that emerged from it, to chart a new and surprising course through a familiar landscape. King was in conversation with Luke Turner, editor of the influential online music publication The Quietus and author of the memoir Out of the Woods.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Simon Winder and Adam Phillips: ‘Lotharingia’

    Simon Winder and Adam Phillips: ‘Lotharingia’

    17/02/2021 Duration: 53min

    Following on from his bestselling and hugely entertaining Germania and Danubia, Simon Winder continues his idiosyncratic journey through Europe’s past with Lotharingia (Picador). Now almost forgotten, Lotharingia arose from the ashes of the Carolingian Empire and stretched from the North Sea coasts of what is now the Netherlands all the way to the Alps, encompassing myriad languages and nationalities. Despite its disappearance and ensuing obscurity Lotharingia, Winder shows, has exercised a surprising and powerful influence on the history of the continent of Europe, from the Early Middle Ages to the present day. Winder was in conversation about Europe’s lost country with psychoanalyst and essayist Adam Phillips.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Hal Foster and Mark Godfrey: On Richard Serra

    Hal Foster and Mark Godfrey: On Richard Serra

    10/02/2021 Duration: 52min

    In his book Conversations About Sculpture (Yale) art historian Hal Foster recapitulates the discussions he has had, over a period of two decades, with the legendary minimalist sculptor Richard Serra. Professor Foster, a regular contributor to the London Review of Books, was in discussion about his book, and about Serra's extraordinary work, with Tate Modern curator Mark Godfrey.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Brecht’s War Primer: Oliver Chanarin, Tom Kuhn  Esther Leslie

    Brecht’s War Primer: Oliver Chanarin, Tom Kuhn & Esther Leslie

    03/02/2021 Duration: 01h19min

    From this 2017 event: Bertolt Brecht, poet, playwright, theatre director and refugee, was a passionate critic of fascism and war. During World War Two, already many years into his exile from Nazi Germany, Brecht started creating what he called ‘photo-epigrams’ to create a singular visual and lyrical attack on war under modern capitalism. As his family fled from the Nazis, 'changing countries more often than our shoes,' Brecht took photographs from newspapers and popular magazines and added short lapidary verses to each in a unique attempt to understand the truth of war using mass media. These photo-epigrams are collected in War Primer, a remarkable work first published in 1955 and made newly available in a new edition by Verso.Chair Gareth Evans is joined by Deutsche Borse Prize-winning photographer Oliver Chanarin, Brecht scholar and translator Tom Kuhn and scholar and critic Esther Leslie in a panel discussion about this outstanding literary memorial to World War Two and one of the most spontaneous, re

  • Dana Spiotta and Alex Clark: Innocents and Others

    Dana Spiotta and Alex Clark: Innocents and Others

    27/01/2021 Duration: 48min

    Dana Spiotta was reading from her novel Innocents and Others, and talking about her work with with journalist and critic Alex Clark.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Anne Michaels and Bidisha: The Necessary Word

    Anne Michaels and Bidisha: The Necessary Word

    20/01/2021 Duration: 51min

    From this 2017 event, Canadian poet and novelist Anne MIchaels, author of the multi-award winning fiction Fugitive Pieces, 'the most important book I have read for forty years' (John Berger), presents two new titles. Infinite Gradation (House Sparrow Press), her first volume of non-fiction, is an astonishing meditation on the moral, emotional and philosophical implications of language and the creative act. All We Saw (Bloomsbury), Anne's latest collection of poetry, continues her mesmerising and lyrical exploration of love, loss and the mystery at the heart of being. She was in conversation with writer and broadcaster Bidisha.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Richard Sennett and Anna Minton: ‘Building and Dwelling’

    Richard Sennett and Anna Minton: ‘Building and Dwelling’

    13/01/2021 Duration: 01h05min

    Rich with arguments that speak directly to our moment - a time when more humans live in urban spaces than ever before - Building and Dwelling (Allen Lane) draws on Richard Sennett's deep learning and intimate engagement with city life to form a bold and original vision for the future of cities. Sennett was in conversation with Anna Minton, author of Big Capital (Penguin).   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In the Dark Room: Brian Dillon and Sophie Ratcliffe

    In the Dark Room: Brian Dillon and Sophie Ratcliffe

    06/01/2021 Duration: 01h35s

    In this event from 2018, Brian Dillon, UK editor of Cabinet magazine and author of several books of essays, fiction, history and art criticism, talked about his first book, In the Dark Room, published by Penguin in 2005 and now available again in a handsome new edition from Fitzcarraldo, with Sophie Ratcliffe, Associate Professor in English, University of Oxford and author of On Sympathy (Oxford, 2008). Exploring the intersections of grief and memory, in his own personal history and beyond, Dillon evokes, in prose of great beauty and lucidity, the pain both of loss, and that of remembering the lost.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lynsey Hanley and Dawn Foster: Estates

    Lynsey Hanley and Dawn Foster: Estates

    21/12/2020 Duration: 01h05min

    Lynsey Hanley's Estates, first published by Granta in 2008, has become over the past decade one of the key texts to analyse Britain's urban landscape in the post-War period. To mark a new edition of her seminal work, Hanley, a regular contributor to the Guardian and the New Statesman, was in conversation with fellow journalist Dawn Foster, who has written widely on housing and social issues.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

page 1 from 20