The Gary Null Show

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Synopsis

Gary takes on the real issues that the mainstream media is afraid to tackle. Tune in to find out the latest about health news, healing, politics, and the economy.

Episodes

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.22.21

    22/12/2021 Duration: 55min

    Plant scientists find recipe for anti-cancer compound in herbs Purdue University, December 21, 2021 Thyme and oregano possess an anti-cancer compound that suppresses tumor development, but adding more to your tomato sauce isn’t enough to gain significant benefit. The key to unlocking the power of these plants is in amplifying the amount of the compound created or synthesizing the compound for drug development. Researchers at Purdue University achieved the first step toward using the compound in pharmaceuticals by mapping its biosynthetic pathway, a sort of molecular recipe of the ingredients and steps needed. Thymol, carvacrol and thymohydroquinone are flavor compounds in thyme, oregano and other plants in the Lamiaceae family. They also have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and other properties beneficial to human health. Thymohydroquinone has been shown to have anti-cancer properties and is particularly of interest, said Dudareva, who also is director of Purdue’s Center for Plant Biology. (NE

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.21.21

    21/12/2021 Duration: 01h01min

    Curcumin could aid diabetic kidney disease patients Hunan University of Chinese Medicine, December 17 2021. A meta-analysis of randomized trials concluded that curcumin supplementation was associated with improved creatinine (a marker of kidney function), cholesterol, glucose and systolic blood pressure compared to a placebo in men and women with diabetic kidney disease, a frequent complication of diabetes. The findings were published on December 2, 2021 in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. (NEXT) Cardiovascular disease risk boosted by stress  University of Gothenburg (Sweden), December 16, 2021 The risk of cardiovascular disease rises with an increasing burden of perceived stress, financial problems and adverse life events, a major international study with University of Gothenburg researchers as main authors shows. They were able to link the risk of both heart attack and stroke with high stress levels. The study, published in the journal JAMA Network Open, included 118,706 individual

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.20.21

    20/12/2021 Duration: 01h01min

    Study estimates lower risk of cardiovascular disease associated with improved vitamin D level University of South Australia, December 10 2021. Research reported on December 5, 2021 in the European Heart Journal estimated that improvement of vitamin D levels to 20 ng/mL could eliminate 4.4% of all cases of cardiovascular disease. “Our results are exciting as they suggest that if we can raise levels of vitamin D within norms, we should also affect rates of cardiovascular disease,” she stated. “By increasing vitamin D-deficient individuals to levels of at least 50 nmol/L [20 ng/mL], we estimate that 4.4 percent of all cardiovascular disease cases could have been prevented.” (NEXT) Capsaicin molecule inhibits growth of breast cancer cells Centre of Genomics (Germany) December 18, 2021 Capsaicin, an active ingredient of pungent substances such as chilli or pepper, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. This was reported by a team following experiments in cultivated tumour cells. In the cultivated cells,

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.17.21

    17/12/2021 Duration: 01h01min

    More evidence for vitamin D in MS prevention   University of California San Francisco and Australian National University, December 13 2021. Neurology reported findings of an association between greater time spent outdoors and a reduction in the risk of developing early onset multiple sclerosis (MS) among children and young adults. “Sun exposure is known to boost vitamin D levels,” explained study co-senior author Emmanuelle Waubant, MD, PhD, who is a professor at the UCSF Department of Neurology. “It also stimulates immune cells in the skin that have a protective role in diseases such as MS. Vitamin D may also change the biological function of the immune cells and, as such, play a role in protecting against autoimmune diseases.” Nineteen percent of participants with MS reported spending less than 30 minutes per day outdoors during the summer before the study, compared to only 6% of those without the disease. In comparison with spending less than 30 minutes outdoors during the previous summer, 30 minutes to

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.16.21

    16/12/2021 Duration: 52min

    New discovery on how omega-3 fatty acids can reduce atherosclerosis Karolinska Institutet, December 15, 2021 A receptor activated by substances formed from omega-3 fatty acids plays a vital role in preventing inflammation in blood vessels and reducing atherosclerosis, a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation reports. The discovery can pave the way for new strategies for treating and preventing cardiovascular disease using omega-3 fatty acids. "We've found that this receptor is dysregulated in atherosclerosis, indicating a disruption in the body's natural healing processes," says the study's first author Hildur Arnardottir, assistant professor at the Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet. "This discovery can pave the way for completely new strategies for treating and preventing atherosclerosis by arresting inflammation in the blood vessels, while also turning on the body's healing processes with the help of omega-3 fatty acids, for exam

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.15.21

    15/12/2021 Duration: 59min

    Flavor your food with 'flavanols (flavan-3-ols)' to burn excess fat, new study suggests Dietary intake of flavanols (flavan-3-ols), type of dietary polyphenolics, could help prevent obesity by sympathetic nervous system-induced browning of fat tissue Shibaura Institute of Technology, December 13, 2021 In cold conditions, brown adipose tissue (BAT) or brown fat generates heat to keep the body warm. Compared with white adipose tissue, BAT has more mitochondria­—subcellular organelles associated with energy production—which allows it to burn calories and produce heat by activating the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp-1). The stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) after cold exposure, exercise, and calorie restriction is well known to induce fat browning. Dietary polyphenols may also activate BAT, causing heat to be dissipated from our bodies. BAT activation and white fat browning are thus both therapeutically significant in the fight against cardiovascular diseases and their comorbidities.

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.14.21

    14/12/2021 Duration: 01h26s

    Flavor your food with 'flavanols (flavan-3-ols)' to burn excess fat, new study suggests Dietary intake of flavanols (flavan-3-ols), type of dietary polyphenolics, could help prevent obesity by sympathetic nervous system-induced browning of fat tissue Shibaura Institute of Technology (Japan), December 13, 2021 In cold conditions, brown adipose tissue (BAT) or brown fat generates heat to keep the body warm. Compared with white adipose tissue, BAT has more mitochondria­—subcellular organelles associated with energy production—which allows it to burn calories and produce heat by activating the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp-1). The stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) after cold exposure, exercise, and calorie restriction is well known to induce fat browning. Dietary polyphenols may also activate BAT, causing heat to be dissipated from our bodies. BAT activation and white fat browning are thus both therapeutically significant in the fight against cardiovascular diseases and their comorb

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.13.21

    13/12/2021 Duration: 56min

    How vitamin D delivers on cardio health University of South Australia, December 6, 2021 Free from the sun, vitamin D delivers a natural source for one of the hormones essential to our bodies, especially the bones. But when you're down on this essential nutrient, it's not only your bones that could suffer, but also your cardio health, according to new research from the University of South Australia. In the first study of its kind, researchers from the UniSA's Australian Centre for Precision Health at SAHMRI have identified genetic evidence for a role of vitamin D deficiency in causing cardiovascular disease. The study, which is published in European Heart Journal today, shows that people with vitamin D deficiency are more likely to suffer from heart disease and higher blood pressure, than those with normal levels of vitamin D. For participants with the lowest concentrations the risk of heart disease was more than double that seen for those with sufficient concentrations. (NEXT) Sleep technique improves cre

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.10.21

    10/12/2021 Duration: 54min

    CoQ10 may help blood sugar management in people with MetS Kashan University of Medical Sciences (Iran), December 5, 2021 Daily supplements of coenzyme Q10 may produce beneficial effects on insulin and blood sugar management in people with metabolic syndrome, says a new study. Writing in the PubMed-listed European Journal of Nutrition , researchers from Kashan University of Medical Sciences in Iran report that CoQ10 supplementation was also associated with significant improvements in serum insulin levels, insulin resistance (measured using the homeostatic model assessment: HOMA-IR), and beta-cell function (homeostatic model assessment-beta cell function: HOMA-B). Results showed that participants in the CoQ10 group experienced significant improvements in insulin levels, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-B, while there was also a trend to improved levels of glutathione and reduced levels of malondialdehyde, a reactive carbonyl compound that is a marker of oxidative stress. (NEXT) Eucalyptus compound effective at treating lu

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.09.21

    09/12/2021 Duration: 55min

    Compounds in leafy green vegetables could help prevent cognitive decline Rush University Medical Center, December 2, 2021.  Rush University Medical Center analyzed data from 960 participants between the ages of 58 and 99 years in the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Individuals whose intake of leafy green vegetables including spinach, kale/collards/greens, and lettuce, was among the top 20% of subjects at a median of 1.3 servings per day had a rate of cognitive decline over follow-up that was significantly slower than that of subjects’ whose intake was among the lowest 20% at 0.1 servings per day. The authors compared the difference to that of someone 11 years younger. When individual nutrients contained in leafy vegetables were analyzed, having an intake among the top 20% of intake of phylloquinone (vitamin K1), lutein, folate, alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), nitrate and kaempferol were each associated with slower cognitive decline in comparison with an intake that was among the lowest fifth. The authors concl

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.08.21

    08/12/2021 Duration: 54min

    Grape seed extract found to extend lifespan of old mice Chinese Academy of Sciences and Mayo Clinic, December 7, 2021 A team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions in China and the U.S. has found that injecting procyanidin C1 (PCC1), a chemical found in grape seed extract, into older mice extended their lifespan. In their paper published in the journal Nature Metabolism, the group describes the link between PCC1 and extended lifespan in mice and the experiments they carried out with the material. The researchers screened 46 plant extracts looking for anti-aging capabilities. They came across PCC1. Initial tests during screening showed it reduced the number of senescent cells in the human prostate. Such cells are known to contribute to aging. Intrigued with their results, the researchers tested it further. They found that at low doses it prevented senescent cells from contributing to inflammation, and at higher doses killed them outright without harming other cells. (NEXT) Gratitude may impr

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.07.21

    07/12/2021 Duration: 56min

    Long-term persistence of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein: evidence and implications Michael Palmer, MD and Sucharit Bhakdi, MD, 27th November, 2021 This paper discusses the recent study by Bansal et al. [1] on the detection of spike protein in persons vaccinated with the Pfizer mRNA vaccine. The most significant finding is that spike protein is found on exosomes, that is, cell-derived vesicles, for at least four months after the second injection. This surprisingly long persistence raises the prospect of sustained inflammation within and damage to organs which express the spike protein. Conclusions • Long-lasting persistence of spike protein • Delayed onset of spike protein expression—but observation limited to spike on exosomes • EMA report on Pfizer also reported relatively slow onset of spike expression; on the other hand, early onset of blood clots etc. suggests early onset of spike expression While some specific claims made by this paper can be debated, the very long-lasting persistence of the spike protein

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.06.21

    06/12/2021 Duration: 54min

    Researcher explains the psychology of successful aging University of California at Los Angeles, November 2, 2021 Successful aging can be the norm, says UCLA psychology professor Alan Castel "There are a lot of myths about aging, and people often have negative stereotypes of what it means to get old," Castel said. "I have studied aging for two decades, and have seen many impressive role models of aging, as well as people who struggle in older age. Happiness increases our lives by four to 10 years, a recent research review suggested. "As an added bonus," Castel writes, "those additional years are likely to be happy ones." (NEXT) New study finds potatoes, when enjoyed as part of a healthy diet, are not associated with elevated heart health risk factors among adolescent girls Boston University, October 29, 2021 Recently published research in the British Journal of Nutrition found that 9-17 year-old girls who consumed up to one cup of potatoes daily had no increased risk of becoming overweight or developing

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.03.21

    03/12/2021 Duration: 54min

    Prunes may help rein in holiday cravings, according to new research University of Liverpool, November 30, 2021 New research from the University of Liverpool, England reports that consuming prunes can help control appetite and reduce overall caloric consumption, serving as a perfect snack to keep holiday cravings at bay. “These studies demonstrate that dried fruit can both produce satiety and be incorporated into the diet during weight management,” said Professor Jason C G Halford, President of the European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO), who was part of the research team. (NEXT) Is the relationship between diet, intestinal bacteria and cells key to preventing systemic inflammation? University of California at Los Angeles,  November 23, 2021 Mice fed a diet high in fat, cholesterol and calories, akin to the Western diet, had higher measures of blood lipids associated with elevated levels of inflammation, a new UCLA study finds. Researchers also identified clues to how the microbiology of the

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.02.21

    02/12/2021 Duration: 58min

    Videos https://brandnewtube.com/watch/sonia-elijah-interviews-efrat-fenigson-from-israel_Ws1DDYkiqAOXdis.html     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWN2PV4v0lk&t=8s   Researchers find new link between a disrupted body clock and inflammatory diseases RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences, November 25, 2021 New research from RCSI has demonstrated the significant role that an irregular body clock plays in driving inflammation in the body's immune cells, with implications for the most serious and prevalent diseases in humans. The circadian body clock generates 24-hour rhythms that keep humans healthy and in time with the day/night cycle. This includes regulating the rhythm of the body's own (innate) immune cells called macrophages. When these cell rhythms are disrupted (due to things like erratic eating/sleeping patterns or shift work), the cells produce molecules which drive inflammation. This can lead to chronic inflammatory diseases such as heart disease, obesity, arthritis, diabetes and ca

  • The Gary Null Show - 12.01.21

    01/12/2021 Duration: 55min

    May be worth adopting plant based diet to ease chronic migraine severity, say doctors Stony Brook University and University of Pennsylvania, November 22, 2021 Prescribed meds, elimination diet, yoga and meditation provided no or little symptom relief Boosting dark green leafy veg intake may be key It may be worth adopting a plant based diet, rich in dark green leafy vegetables, to ease the symptoms of chronic migraine, suggest doctors in the online journal BMJ Case Reports. (next) Exercising at the start of fast can help people reach ketosis 3.5 hours faster: study Brigham Young University, November 24, 2021  Now a new Brigham Young University study published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise finds that exercising intensely at the start of a fast may help maximize health benefits of temporarily foregoing food. Ketosis occurs when the body runs out of glucose—its first, preferred fuel—and begins breaking down stored fat for energy, producing chemicals called ketones as a byprod

  • The Gary Null Show - 11.30.21

    30/11/2021 Duration: 59min

    HEALTH NEWS    May be worth adopting plant based diet to ease chronic migraine severity, say doctors Stony Brook University and University of Pennsylvania, November 22, 2021   Prescribed meds, elimination diet, yoga and meditation provided no or little symptom relief Boosting dark green leafy veg intake may be key It may be worth adopting a plant based diet, rich in dark green leafy vegetables, to ease the symptoms of chronic migraine, suggest doctors in the online journal BMJ Case Reports. The recommendation comes after they treated a man who had endured severe migraine headaches without aura for more than 12 years.  He had tried prescribed meds (Zolmitriptan and Topiramate); cutting out potential ‘trigger’ foods, including chocolate, cheese, nuts, caffeine, and dried fruit; and yoga and meditation in a bid to blunt the severity and frequency of his headaches. Nothing had worked. His headaches were accompanied by sensitivity to light and sound, and nausea and vomiting. On a scale of 0–10, he s

  • The Gary Null Show - 11.29.21

    29/11/2021 Duration: 58min

    Yoga improves quality of life in men with new diagnosis of prostate cancer University of Texas at San Antonio, November 23, 2021 An estimated 1.4 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer worldwide in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. With a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, these men have approximately a 30% incidence of depression and anxiety, a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and a twofold higher risk of committing suicide. Yoga, a set of specific body postures combined with breathing techniques and mindfulness, may be an easy-to-implement answer in this stressful situation, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. A pilot randomized clinical trial by urology researchers at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, enrolled 29 men who were awaiting prostatectomy. Fourteen were randomized to participate in yoga and 15 were assigned

  • The Gary Null Show - 11.26.21

    26/11/2021 Duration: 58min

    Gary's links to articles talked about on show    https://thepulse.one/2021/11/23/130-research-studies-affirming-the-power-of-natural-immunity-to-covid/   https://new.awakeningchannel.com/the-world-is-awakening-global-tyranny-exposed/   https://scivisionpub.com/pdfs/covid19-rna-based-vaccines-and-the-risk-of-prion-disease-1503.pdf   http://www.opensourcetruth.com/disturbing-phrase-died-suddenly-sharply-trends-upward-following-vaccine-rollout/   https://ijvtpr.com/index.php/IJVTPR/article/view/29/55   https://www.globalresearch.ca/vaccinated-english-adults-under-60-dying-twice-rate-unvaccinated-people-same-age/5762415   https://market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=244273   https://new.awakeningchannel.com/who-covid-vax-adverse-events-skyrocket/   https://www.americaoutloud.com/covid-19-vaccine-induce-disease-emerges-as-leading-public-health-threat/   https://humansarefree.com/2021/11/most-vaxxed-country-in-the-world-cancels-christmas-due-to-huge-covid-spike.html   https://humansarefree.com/2021

  • The Gary Null Show - 11.25.21

    25/11/2021 Duration: 54min

    The Infrastructure and Mission of Facebook's and Big Tech's Bias and Censorship    Ryan Hartwig is one of the early whistleblowers to come forward to reveal Facebook operations to censor voices contrary to centrist, liberal Democrat narratives and the company's culture of systemic bias. His revelations were first made public by Project Veritas last year. Since then he is the founder of The Harwig Foundation for Free Speech and has recently published a book, co-authored with Kent Heckenlively, "Behind the Mask of Facebook:  A Whistleblower's Shocking Story of Big Tech Bias and Censorship," which recounts his time with the international digital solutions firm Cognizant, where he worked as a content moderator on behalf of Facebook to moderate and censor content on its social media.  His efforts have led to a criminal referral to the Department of Justice for Mark Zuckerberg and aided an FEC complaint against Facebook in the John James vs Gary Peters US senate race in Michigan. Ryan holds a degree in Spanish Li

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